Seven Pillars of Prosperity—Diversifying Economic Growth in the Caucasus and Central Asia

2017-04-15T14:24:32-04:00May 5, 2011|

Medium-term economic growth prospects in the Caucasus and Central Asia region are strong. But, to secure ongoing prosperity, the eight countries of the region—Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan—will need to look beyond traditional sources of growth. The challenge for policymakers will be to foster new and more diverse growth drivers, outside mining, oil, and gas. There are seven policy pillars that can help them do that, including strengthening economic and financial ties within the region.

Warning! Inequality May Be Hazardous to Your Growth

2017-04-15T14:25:28-04:00April 8, 2011|

Some people dismiss inequality and focus on overall growth—arguing that a rising tide lifts all boats. But when—as in the U.S. in recent decades—a handful of yachts become ocean liners while the rest remain lowly canoes, something is seriously amiss. In fact, inequality matters. And it matters in all corners of the globe. Medical researchers ask how smoking, weight, and so on influence life expectancy. We wondered, what keeps long periods of high growth going? Somewhat to our surprise, income inequality stood out as a key driver. The upshot? It is a big mistake to separate analyses of growth and income distribution. A rising tide is still critical to lifting all the boats. But lifting up the lowest boats may actually help to keep the tide rising!

A Problem Shared Is a Problem Halved: The G-20’s “Mutual Assessment Process”

2017-04-15T14:34:06-04:00August 26, 2010|

The Group of Twenty industrialized and emerging market economies (G-20) has broken new ground over the past year or two. It has embraced the type of collaborative approach to policy design and review that is well suited to today’s interdependent world, where policies in one country can often have far-reaching effects on others. In this spirit, the backbone of the G-20’s “Framework for Strong, Sustainable, and Balanced Growth” is a multilateral process that includes a ‘mutual assessment’ of their progress toward meeting shared objectives. But, what exactly will this G-20 Mutual Assessment Process—or “MAP”—imply in terms of prospective actions? And what have we learned so far?

Changing Times: Global Governance Reform and the IMF

2017-04-15T14:42:27-04:00January 11, 2010|

By John Lipsky

The economic and financial crisis of the past two years has placed in high relief profound changes in global economic and financial realities. Most notably, the crisis has underscored the shift in relative economic weight in favor of dynamic emerging market economies. In response, the G-20— a grouping that includes both advanced and large emerging economies—has stepped forward as the premier political venue for addressing economic and financial policy challenges.

These changes are exerting significant influence on the evolution of global governance, and they directly involve the IMF in two concrete ways. First, new advances are taking place in multilateral economic policy cooperation, with Fund participation. Second, realignment of Fund governance has been put on a fast track, with delivery scheduled for January 2011.

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