Chart of the Week: Sub-Saharan Africa’s Growth—A Tale of Different Experiences

2019-03-13T10:53:11-04:00December 13, 2018|

By IMFBlog

December 13, 2018

Villagers of Moruleng mining community in South Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa countries can see an increase in growth by relying less on commodities and more on non-resource intensive investments. (Photo: SIPHIWE SIBEKI/Reuters/Newscom)

The story of Africa’s growth rate over recent years is a tale with several story lines.  […]

Chart of the Week: Grading the G-20 on its Growth Goals

2019-03-13T11:50:42-04:00November 19, 2018|

By Helge Berger and Margaux MacDonald

November 19, 2018 

Español, Português

Growth is stronger in the G-20 but progress toward more balanced, sustainable, and inclusive growth is slow (photo: Egon Bömsch imageBROKER/Newscom)

This blog is dedicated to the memory of Giang Ho, an IMF economist who died suddenly this past August. Her efforts and ingenuity were critical to carrying out this analytical work. We miss her and will never forget her. 
[…]

Chart of the Week: Government Debt Is Not the Whole Story: Look at the Assets

2019-03-13T12:26:49-04:00October 23, 2018|

By IMFBlog

October 23, 2018

The Millennium Bridge in London, England: governments often don’t include the value of their assets, like bridges and roads, as well as natural resources, when they measure public wealth (Ingram Publishing/Newscom)

Lost track of your personal finances?  You are not alone.  Your government has often lost track of its finances too.  While it keeps close tabs on debt, it is less clear on how much it owns: the assets. […]

Global Growth Plateaus as Economic Risks Materialize

2019-03-13T13:33:15-04:00October 8, 2018|

By Maurice Obstfeld

October 9, 2018

عربي中文, Español, FrançaisBaˈhasa indoneˈsia, 日本語, Русский

Uncertainty over trade policy is becoming a drag on economic activity (photo: Imagine China/Newscom)

The latest World Economic Outlook report projects that global growth will remain steady over 2018–19 at last year’s rate of 3.7 percent. This growth exceeds that achieved in any of the years between 2012 and 2016. It occurs as many economies have reached or are nearing full employment and as earlier deflationary fears have dissipated. Thus, policymakers still have an excellent opportunity to build resilience and implement growth-enhancing reforms.

[…]

Trade and Remittances Within Africa

2019-03-13T15:29:35-04:00August 1, 2018|

By Francisco Arizala, Matthieu Bellon, Margaux MacDonald, Montfort Mlachila, and Mustafa Y. Yenice

August 1, 2018 

Versions in FrançaisPortuguês

Countries in sub-Saharan Africa are more closely tied than ever, thanks to rising trade with one another and remittances (photo: AfricaImages/Getty Images by iStock)

Contrary to popular belief, countries in sub-Saharan Africa are more closely tied than ever, thanks to rising trade with one another and remittances—the money people send home when working in another country.  […]

5 Things You Need to Know About the IMF and Climate Change

2019-03-14T10:35:05-04:00June 8, 2018|

By Ian Parry

June 8, 2018

Versions in  عربي,  中文,  Español, Français, 日本語Português, Русский 

A polar bear on shrinking ice in the Arctic: climate change means the world is getting hotter (photo: Sven-Erik Arndt/Newscom)

The world is getting hotter, resulting in rising sea levels, more extreme weather like hurricanes, droughts, and floods, as well as other risks to the global climate like the irreversible collapsing of ice sheets.  […]

South Africa’s Lesetja Kganyago: Fintech Is a Central Banker’s Friend

2019-03-15T11:16:29-04:00January 26, 2018|

By IMFBlog

January 26, 2018 

Lesetja Kganyago, South Africa’s Central Bank Governor and Chairman of the International Monetary and Financial Committee (photo: IMF staff).

While central bankers are often seen as somewhat traditionalist, South Africa’s Reserve Bank Governor Lesetja Kganyago is breaking that mold. Kganyago sees how new technology—or fintech—is transforming the financial sector, and in this podcast, he says there is no turning back. […]

Roads or Schools: A Critical Tradeoff

2019-03-15T13:32:49-04:00November 9, 2017|

By Manoj Atolia, Bin Grace Li, Ricardo Marto, and Giovanni Melina

November 9, 2017 

Versions in 中文(Chinese), Español (Spanish), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese)

Low-income countries tend to spend less on schools than on roads as a share of GDP (photo: iStock by Getty Images).

Roads or schools? It’s a question akin to the “guns or butter” choice that governments around the world confronted in the 20th century: How to spend a nation’s finite resources to produce the maximum benefit for its people.

In our recent IMF Working Paper, we find that low-income countries tend to spend less on schools than on roads as a share of GDP—even though investment in education may be a more pressing need in their societies. 

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