Chart of the Week: A Bumpy Road Ahead for Electric Cars

2019-03-13T15:17:55-04:00August 13, 2018|

By Christian Bogmans and Lama Kiyasseh

August 13, 2018

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Electric car charging station in Berlin, Germany: prices for lithium and cobalt—key ingredients in rechargeable batteries—are rising due limited supply and growing demand for electric cars (photo: Jens Kalaene/Newscom)

The surge in demand for electric cars has been fueled in part by the falling costs of lithium-ion […]

Chart of the Week: The Spread of Ideas and Innovation

2019-03-13T15:48:55-04:00July 30, 2018|

By IMFBlog

July 30, 2018 

Versions in  عربيEspañolFrançais中文, 日本語, PortuguêsРусский 

Young woman watches robotic fish in Gangneung, South Korea: the spread of knowledge and technology across counties has intensified because of globalization (photo: Richard Ellis/UPI/Newscom).

Globalization has accelerated the spread of knowledge and technology across borders. This has helped to increase productivity and potential growth in many countries and at the global level. […]

China’s Housing Market: Defying the Odds?

2019-03-27T12:10:48-04:00February 1, 2016|

by iMFdirect

Housing is on everyone’s mind. The collapse of housing bubbles can be very costly.

  • In Japan, house prices rose by about 40 percent during the mid-1980s; the collapse was followed by a ‘lost decade’ in which incomes did not grow and house prices fell by over 40 percent.
  • In the United States, house prices increased by about 30 percent between 2001 and 2006; their collapse was followed by the global financial crisis.

[…]

Treating Inequality with Redistribution: Is the Cure Worse than the Disease?

2017-04-14T02:10:04-04:00February 26, 2014|

By Jonathan D. Ostry and Andrew Berg

(Versions in EspañolFrançaisPortuguêsРусский中文)

Rising income inequality looms high on the global policy agenda, reflecting not only fears of its pernicious social and political effects, (including questions about the consistency of extreme inequality with democratic governance), but also the economic implications. While positive incentives are surely needed to reward work and innovation, excessive inequality is likely to undercut growth, for example by undermining access to health and education, causing investment-reducing political and economic instability, and […]

Lagarde: Women Can Help Grow the World Economy

2017-04-14T02:16:21-04:00September 23, 2013|

(Versions in Español and عربي)

Hot off the press: a new study out today from our economists pointing to the striking economic benefits that could come from increased female participation in the work force.

IMF Chief Christine Lagarde, calling attention to the findings of the paper, “Women, Work, and the Economy,” made the case for policymakers to shift into high gear and give women equal opportunities to participate in the work force.

[…]

For Richer, Not Poorer: Energy Subsidies in India

2017-04-15T13:35:17-04:00June 24, 2013|

By David Coady and Thomas Richardson

Many countries seek to protect poorer households by subsidizing the consumption of fuel products. However, recent IMF research shows that fuel subsidies are both inefficient and inequitable, including in India.

But what about India? Are fuel subsidies also anti-poor? Sadly, yes. A new IMF working paper  shows that India’s fuel subsidies are both fiscally costly and socially regressive.

[…]

Economics – New Links for Students from the IMF

2017-04-15T14:07:47-04:00May 20, 2012|

The IMF's Finance & Development magazine has recently published two helpful online compilations of articles that may be useful to students and those interested in economic issues. They are rich collections of material that are totally free!! They are a collection of profiles of leading economists and some clearly written explanations of fundamental economic terms.

Closer, Ever Closer

2017-04-15T14:07:57-04:00May 17, 2012|

Over the past two decades—in line with the region’s growing role in the global economy—Asia’s equity markets have become increasingly sensitive to global financial developments. More specifically, we have discovered that equity returns in Asia generally now move in tandem with those in systemic economies. (By systemic economies, we are talking here about those countries—such as the United States and the United Kingdom which are home to major, global, financial centers such as Wall Street and the City of London.)
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