The Uneven Path Ahead: The Effect of Brexit on Different Sectors in the UK Economy

2019-03-13T10:57:28-04:00December 4, 2018|

By Jiaqian Chen

December 4, 2018

عربي, 中文Español, Français日本語,  PortuguêsРусский

A UK border agency worker holds a passport: As a member of the European Union, free labor mobility has enabled the UK to hire talent from across the EU (photo: Mac Gregor/Reuters/Newscom)

The United Kingdom is set to leave the European Union in March 2019. Our […]

Chart of the Week: Conflict’s Legacy for Growth

2019-03-25T16:17:19-04:00May 8, 2017|

By IMFBlog

Versions in عربي (Arabic)

May 8, 2017

Conflict has been on the rise since the early 2000s given the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria.

 Conflict leads not only to immeasurable human costs, but also to substantial economic losses with consequences that can persist for years. The tragic rise in conflict has weighed on global GDP growth in recent years, given the increasing number of countries experiencing strife, the severe effect on economic activity, and the considerable size of some of the affected economies.

The IMF’s most recent World Economic Outlook (Box 1.1) takes a closer look through […]

Migrants Bring Economic Benefits for Advanced Economies

2019-03-26T15:37:17-04:00October 24, 2016|

By Florence Jaumotte, Ksenia Koloskova, and Sweta Saxena

Version in Español (Spanish)

Migration, no matter how controversial politically, makes sense economically. A new IMF study shows that, over the longer term, both high- and low-skilled workers who migrate bring benefits to their new home countries by increasing income per person and living standards. High-skilled migrants bring diverse talent and expertise, while low-skilled migrants fill essential occupations for which natives are in short supply and allow natives to be employed at higher-skilled jobs. Moreover, the gains are broadly shared by the population. It may therefore be well-worth […]

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