The IMF’s Work on Inequality: Bridging Research and Reality

By Prakash Loungani and Jonathan D. Ostry

Versions in عربي (Arabic),  中文 (Chinese), Français (French), and Español (Spanish)

Over the past three decades, income inequality has gone up in most advanced economies and in many developing ones as well. Why? Much of the research on inequality has focused on advances in technology and liberalization of trade as the main drivers. While technology and trade are global trends that are difficult to resist, IMF studies have shown that the design of government policies matters and can help limit increases in inequality. (more…)

Capital Controls: When Are Multilateral Considerations of the Essence?

When should multilateral considerations trump national interests in the imposition of controls on capital flows? An IMF paper explores the reasons why countries may want to impose controls and looks at when the wider interest should be taken into consideration, requiring some multilateral principles for their safe management.

The Case for a Managed Float under Inflation Targeting

It is often claimed that inflation targeting , to be successful, needs to include a high degree of exchange rate flexibility, with the policy rate geared to stabilizing inflation and the exchange rate allowed to fluctuate freely. But a new paper from the IMF examines the case for using two policy instruments—the policy interest rate and sterilized foreign exchange market intervention—in emerging market countries aiming to maintain low inflation while avoiding the damage that large and abrupt currency movements may engender. It argues that in a world of volatile capital movements, and sharp ups and downs in exchange rates, there are important benefits to making use of all available policy instruments, both from a single country’s perspective, and from a global standpoint. Provided policymakers are clear about their objectives, there is no conflict between an inflation targeting framework and making use of the foreign exchange market intervention instrument to attenuate deviations of exchange rates.

Haves and Have Less—Why Inequality Throws Us Off Balance

We used to think that overall economic growth would pull everyone up. While the rich might be getting richer, everyone would benefit and would see higher living standards. That was the unspoken bargain of the market system. But now research is showing that, in many countries, inequality is on the rise and the gap between the rich and the poor is widening, particularly over the past quarter-century.

By | September 14th, 2011|IMF, Inequality, International Monetary Fund|3 Comments
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