Chart of the Week: Grading the G-20 on its Growth Goals

2019-03-13T11:50:42-04:00November 19, 2018|

By Helge Berger and Margaux MacDonald

November 19, 2018 

Español, Português

Growth is stronger in the G-20 but progress toward more balanced, sustainable, and inclusive growth is slow (photo: Egon Bömsch imageBROKER/Newscom)

This blog is dedicated to the memory of Giang Ho, an IMF economist who died suddenly this past August. Her efforts and ingenuity were critical to carrying out this analytical work. We miss […]

Chart of the Week: The Spread of Ideas and Innovation

2019-03-13T15:48:55-04:00July 30, 2018|

By IMFBlog

July 30, 2018 

Versions in  عربيEspañolFrançais中文, 日本語, PortuguêsРусский 

Young woman watches robotic fish in Gangneung, South Korea: the spread of knowledge and technology across counties has intensified because of globalization (photo: Richard Ellis/UPI/Newscom).

Globalization has accelerated the spread of knowledge and technology across borders. This has helped to increase productivity and potential growth in many countries and at the global level. […]

How the Commodity Boom Helped Tackle Poverty and Inequality in Latin America

2019-03-14T10:21:04-04:00June 21, 2018|

By Ravi Balakrishnan and Frederik Toscani

June 21, 2018 

Versions in Español, Português

People buying produce in a busy market in Bahia, Brazil. During the commodity boom, Brazil saw significant reductions in poverty and inequality (photo: golero/iStock by Getty Images)

Latin America may be the most unequal region in the world, but it is the only region to significantly lower inequality over the past two decades, […]

Technology and the Future of Work

2019-03-14T12:01:56-04:00May 1, 2018|

By Adrian Peralta, and Agustin Roitman

May 1, 2018 

Versions in  عربي (Arabic), baˈhasa indoneˈsia(Indonesian), 中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish), 日本語 (Japanese), Português (Portuguese), Русский (Russian)

Technology impacts how we work (photo: BSIP/Newscom).

Many feel anxious about the impact of new technology on their jobs. This is not new. In fact, it dates back at least to the Luddites movement at the outset of the Industrial Revolution. And it resurfaced during the Great Depression and again […]

Wanted: Policies to Encourage and Enable Work in Advanced Economies

2019-03-14T12:57:05-04:00April 9, 2018|

By Francesco Grigoli, Zsóka Kóczán, and Petia Topalova

April 9, 2018 

Versions in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese),  Português (Portuguese), Русский (Russian)

Aging may slow economic growth in advanced economies (photo: Zero Creatives Cultura/Newscom).

Population growth in advanced economies is slowing, life expectancy is rising, and the number of elderly people is soaring. Because older workers participate less in the labor market, the aging of the population could slow growth […]

Roads or Schools: A Critical Tradeoff

2019-03-15T13:32:49-04:00November 9, 2017|

By Manoj Atolia, Bin Grace Li, Ricardo Marto, and Giovanni Melina

November 9, 2017 

Versions in 中文(Chinese), Español (Spanish), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese)

Low-income countries tend to spend less on schools than on roads as a share of GDP (photo: iStock by Getty Images).

Roads or schools? It’s a question akin to the “guns or butter” choice that governments around the world confronted in the 20th century: How to spend […]

Close But Not There Yet: Getting to Full Employment in the United States

2019-03-27T17:41:09-04:00April 28, 2015|

By Ravi Balakrishnan and Juan Solé

(Version in Español)

Last month’s report on U.S. jobs was disappointing, with far fewer jobs than expected added in March. A longer-term look at trends yields a different picture, however. Over the past year, U.S. job creation has been impressive. Payroll gains have averaged 260,000 per month—well above the 160,000 monthly average seen throughout the 2010–13 recovery.

[…]

A Tale of Two States—Bringing Back U.S. Productivity Growth

2017-04-14T01:54:40-04:00September 25, 2014|

By Roberto Cardarelli and Lusine Lusinyan 

(Versión en español)

Today’s Pop Quiz: What do Oregon and New Mexico have in common? What could possibly link the spectacular vistas of Crater Lake to the glistening White Sands?

Answer: One link is these two states have the highest share of computer and electronic production in the entire United States. Think Intel in the Silicon Forest or Los Alamos. They also rank similarly in information technology usage by their businesses.

For Crater Lake: (photo: Eye <a href=[…]

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