Avoiding Another Year of Living Dangerously: Time to Secure Financial Stability

In various guises, the “Year of Living Dangerously” has been used to describe the global financial crisis, the policy response to the crisis, and its aftermath. But, we’ve slipped well beyond a year and the financial system is still flirting with danger. Financial stability risks may have eased, reflecting improvements in the economic outlook and continuing accommodative policies. But those supportive policies—while necessary to restart the economy—have also masked serious, underlying financial vulnerabilities that need to be addressed as quickly as possible. Many advanced economies are “living dangerously” because the legacy of high debt burdens is weighing on economic activity and balance sheets, keeping risks to financial stability elevated. At the same time, many emerging market countries risk overheating and the build-up of financial imbalances—in the context of rapid credit growth, increasing asset prices, and strong and volatile capital inflows. Here is our suggested roadmap for policymakers to address these vulnerabilities and risks, and achieve durable financial stability.

Who’s Talking About the Future of Macroeconomic Policies

Last month's conference at the IMF spurred plenty of discussion about the future of macroeconomic policies after the global financial crisis. Economic models, policy tools, and how they are applied need to catch up with changes in the global economic and financial system. You've heard here about views from the conference, but there's been plenty of discussion going on outside the IMF. Here's a snapshot....

By | April 5th, 2011|Economic research, International Monetary Fund|2 Comments
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