Which Way the Wind Blows

2017-04-14T01:55:30-04:00September 2, 2014|

Jeff Hayden altBy Jeff Hayden

You can call this edition of F&D magazine our Bob Dylan issue. It may seem odd for an economics magazine to draw inspiration from the legendary singer/songwriter, but one of his most famous lines, “The times, they are a-changin,’” reverberated through our corridors as we put together this special issue on the global economy’s past and future.

We weren’t humming the tune to pass the time. The lyrics seemed especially relevant to us this year, as we mark the 70th anniversary of the IMF and World Bank and the 50th anniversary of F&D. The world has seen a staggering amount of change in the past seven decades.

So, with these two anniversaries in mind and with Dylan’s ode to changing times in the air, we focused our attention on the transformation of the global economy—looking back and looking ahead. We wanted to address the question, what will the global economy look like in another 70 years?

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Promoting Multilateral Solutions for a Globalized World

2017-04-15T14:04:00-04:00August 30, 2012|

The new issue of Finance & Development magazine looks at different aspects of interconnectedness. Kishore Mahbubani, dean of the National University of Singapore’s Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, argues that what he terms the global village increasingly requires global solutions to big emerging problems such as climate change. Kemal Derviş, former head of the United Nations Development Programme who is now a vice president at the Brookings Institution, looks at three fundamental shifts in the global economy that are leading to major adjustments in the balance between east and west.

New links for economics and finance

2017-04-15T14:11:12-04:00March 3, 2012|

Track global economic news on IMF Survey magazine's new Google+ channel, plus get our new ipad app for IMF news and data--it lets you chart and view global economic indicators and forecasts.

Get the Basics in Economics from the IMF’s One-Stop Shop

2017-04-15T14:13:03-04:00February 15, 2012|

The IMF's Finance & Development magazine has just come out with a useful web compilation of stories in its Back to Basics series on economics. The page is aimed at students, academics, and those seeking a broader understanding of economic ideas. It pulls together articles from the “Back to Basics” column in the quarterly magazine that have been published since 2003.

Africa: Changing the Narrative

2017-04-15T14:15:46-04:00December 2, 2011|

Enduring poverty and conflict are so stark in Africa that it is sometimes difficult to see what else is happening. In April 2011, a study published by the Columbia Journalism Review titled “Hiding the Real Africa” documented how easily Africa makes news headlines in the West when a major famine, pandemic, or violent crisis breaks. But less attention is given to positive trends and underlying successes. In many cases, despite accelerated economic growth over the past 10 years, the rise of a middle class of consumers, and a more dynamic private sector attracting indigenous entrepreneurs, the narrative about Africa has remained focused on the bad news. That has, fortunately, started to change. This week’s cover story in The Economist, on “Rising Africa”, is testament to that. So too is the just-released December 2011 issue of Finance and Development (F&D) magazine on “Changing Africa: Rise of a Middle Class”, which explores Africa's potential.

Haves and Have Less—Why Inequality Throws Us Off Balance

2017-04-15T14:19:07-04:00September 14, 2011|

We used to think that overall economic growth would pull everyone up. While the rich might be getting richer, everyone would benefit and would see higher living standards. That was the unspoken bargain of the market system. But now research is showing that, in many countries, inequality is on the rise and the gap between the rich and the poor is widening, particularly over the past quarter-century.

Wising Up to the Rising Costs of Aging Populations

2017-04-15T14:19:31-04:00August 14, 2011|

The world is on the threshold of a stunning demographic transformation caused by falling fertility and rising life expectancy. Global aging promises to affect every dimension of economic, social, and political life—from the shape of the family to the shape of the world order.
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