Assessing Climate-Change Risk by Stress Testing for Financial Resilience

2020-02-06T09:59:37-05:00February 5, 2020|

By Tobias Adrian, James Morsink, and Liliana Schumacher

عربي, 中文, Español, Français, 日本語Português, Русский

As society braces for the potential havoc a changing climate could induce, it’s vital to gauge the range of shocks that the economy may soon endure. One way to quantify the effects of the potentially systemic shocks that could ripple through the financial system is to administer “stress tests”—a well-designed analytical process that has, for decades, been used by the IMF, World Bank and financial supervisors for detailed scenario planning to prevent […]

Welfare Versus GDP: What Makes People Better Off

2019-03-15T09:46:00-04:00March 7, 2018|

By Geoffrey Bannister and Alexandros Mourmouras

March 7, 2018

Oslo, Norway. In rich countries like Norway, that have greater life expectancy, more leisure, and lower inequality, measured well-being is higher than income (photo: iStock by Getty Images).

For years, economists have worked to develop a way of measuring general well-being and comparing it across countries. The main metric has been differences in income or gross domestic product per […]

Global Energy Subsidies Are Big—About US$5 Trillion Big

2019-03-27T17:14:00-04:00May 18, 2015|

By Sanjeev Gupta and Michael Keen

(Versions in 中文, Français, 日本語Русский and Español)

In their blog, Ben Clements and Vitor Gaspar make the points that global energy subsidies are still very substantial, that there is a strong need for reform in many countries, and that now is a great time to do it. This blog sets out what we mean by “energy subsidies,” provides details on their estimation, and explains how they continue to be high despite the recent drop in international energy prices (Chart […]

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