What We Have Seen and Learned 20 Years After the Asian Financial Crisis

2019-03-25T12:49:43-04:00July 13, 2017|

By Mitsuhiro Furusawa

July 13, 2017

Versions in  عربي (Arabic), Bahasa (Indonesia),  中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish), Français (French), 
日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian)

A trader in Seoul, South Korea: Asia is the largest contributor to global growth (photo: Ryu Seung-il/Polaris/Newscom)

Asia today is the fastest-growing region in the world, and the largest contributor to global growth. It has six members of the Group of Twenty advanced and emerging economies, and its economic and […]

Fiscal Costs of Hidden Deficits: Beware—When It Rains, It Pours

2019-03-27T12:09:26-04:00February 9, 2016|

By Elva Bova, Marta Ruiz-Arranz, Frederik Toscani, and Elif Ture

(Version in Español)

Budgets can be full of surprises. And not always good ones. Often times, debt increases significantly because an unforeseen obligation materializes. These contingent liabilities, as they are known in the economist’s jargon, can have significant economic and fiscal costs. In fact, on many occasions, large and unexpected increases in debt across the world were due to the materialization of contingent liabilities. That is why they are often called hidden deficits.

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Capital Flows to Asia Revisited: Monetary Policy Options

2017-04-15T14:22:06-04:00June 2, 2011|

Capital flows emerging Asia should be high on the ‘watch list’ for policymakers in the region. But, perhaps, not in the way we had previously anticipated. Twelve months ago we were keenly attuned to the risks posed by the foreign capital that flooded into Asia from mid-2009 onwards. Now, what we’re seeing is not really all that “exceptional.” With the recent surge, net overall capital flows to emerging have not surpassed the peaks reached in past episodes of large inflows to the region. Of course, that’s not to say it's all blue skies. The nature of inflows is different this time—dominated by portfolio flows—and that poses new challenges and risks for policymakers.

Listening to and Learning from Asia

2017-04-15T14:35:41-04:00July 15, 2010|

In Daejeon, Korea earlier this week, a remarkable event took place that enabled the world to hear the voice of Asia and to learn how the region has been able to show such great resilience in the face of the worst global financial crisis since the 1930s. On July 12 and 13, more than 1,000 officials, economists, bankers, analysts, and media assembled for a conference titled Asia 21: Leading the Way Forward, hosted by the Korean government and the IMF. I personally learned a great deal about Asia’s growing stake in the global economy—and the global economy’s growing stake in Asia. As the world strives to leave the crisis behind, the economic center of gravity is shifting increasingly eastwards, and Asia’s role is more vital than ever before.

Asia’s Corporate Saving Mystery

2017-04-15T14:49:53-04:00November 8, 2009|

As Asia starts down the path to recovery, it is going to have to tackle two issues which are constraining its long-term growth potential: firms that save but do not invest and wealthy households that are reluctant to consume.

Debating the IMF with Students

2017-04-15T14:51:22-04:00October 1, 2009|

By Caroline Atkinson

In town for the Annual Meetings, Dominique Strauss-Kahn, our Managing Director, paid a visit to Bilgi University in the heart of Istanbul. He spoke to a gathering of students about the role of the IMF in the current crisis, and took some of their questions. 

The Managing Director likened the IMF to an “economic Red Cross” because its goal is to help solve a country’s economic problems while avoiding social unrest and war. He noted that the relationship between peace and economic stability was well understood by the people who founded the IMF in 1944, […]

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