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No Time to Stand Still: Strengthening Global Growth and Building Inclusive Economies

By | July 5th, 2017|Advanced Economies, aging, Asia, developing countries, Economic outlook, Economic research, Emerging Markets, G-20, Global Governance, inclusive growth, Inequality, International Monetary Fund, jobs, technology, U.S.|

By Christine Lagarde

July 5, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese), Français (French), Deutsch (German), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

The port of Hamburg, Germany: G20 leaders meet to discuss policies to strengthen the global economic recovery (photo: Markus Lange/robertharding/Newscom)

Nearly sixty years ago, a little-known band called the Beatles arrived in Hamburg, got a haircut, recorded their first song, and found their sound.

Taking a cue from the Fab Four, world leaders gathering for the Group of Twenty Summit this week can make the most of their time in Hamburg—and leave Germany with a sound plan to strengthen global growth.

Continue reading “No Time to Stand Still: Strengthening Global Growth and Building Inclusive Economies” »

Fintech: Capturing the Benefits, Avoiding the Risks

By | June 20th, 2017|Advanced Economies, capital flows, capital markets, Economic outlook, Economic research, education, Emerging Markets, exports, Globalization, IMF, imports, inclusive growth, Investment, labor markets, productivity, technology, Transition|

By Christine Lagarde

June 20, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

A signboard at a store in Guangzhou, China, lists various forms of mobile payment (photo: Imagine China/Newscom)

When you send an email, it takes one click of the mouse to deliver a message next door or across the planet. Gone are the days of special airmail stationery and colorful stamps to send letters abroad.

International payments are different. Destination still matters. You might use cash to pay for a cup of tea at a local shop, but not to order tea leaves from distant Sri Lanka. Depending on the carrier, the tea leaves might arrive before the seller can access the payment. Continue reading “Fintech: Capturing the Benefits, Avoiding the Risks” »

Chart of the Week: Why Energy Prices Matter

By | June 5th, 2017|Advanced Economies, Environment, Fiscal policy, growth, health, IMF, infrastructure, Investment, technology, Uncategorized|

By IMFBlog

June 5, 2017

Versions in   عربي (Arabic),  中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish)

(photo: Imagine China/Newscom)

Wind turbines and solar panels generate electricity at power station, Jiangsu, China. Getting energy prices right will help reduce environmental costs and save lives (photo: Imagine China/Newscom)

World Environment Day is an occasion to consider why it’s so important to get energy prices right. The IMF has long argued that energy prices that reflect environmental costs can help governments achieve their goals not only for improving public health but also for inclusive growth and sound public finances.  

A number of countries such as Egypt, Indonesia, Mexico, and Saudi Arabia have recently taken important steps to increase energy prices towards market levels. Some others, such as India and China have made important strides in cost-effective renewable energy sources—and reduced their reliance on fossil fuels. Still, undercharging for fossil fuel energy remains pervasive and substantial and can cause severe health effects from pollution, particularly in densely populated countries. Continue reading “Chart of the Week: Why Energy Prices Matter” »

Tomorrow’s Workplace

By | May 31st, 2017|education, Employment, Gender issues, IMF, income, labor force, U.S., unemployment, youth|

By Camilla Lund Andersen

May 31, 2017

It seems fitting that we are launching our redesigned magazine with a cover dedicated to millennials and the future of work. But while Finance & Development has mainly changed its appearance, not its content, young adults may have to make more fundamental adjustments to keep pace with the requirements of tomorrow’s workplace. Millennials face myriad challenges as they seek to carve out a prosperous future for themselves.

Continue reading “Tomorrow’s Workplace” »

JaeBin Ahn

By | May 22nd, 2017|

 JaeBin Ahn is an economist in the Open Economy Macroeconomics Division of the IMF's Research Department, covering external sector assessment issues. Prior to this position, he was in the IMF's Asia and Pacific Department, covering Indonesia and Malaysia. Before joining the IMF’s Economist Program, he was a dissertation intern at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. His area of research includes international trade and finance, with particular interest in deriving macroeconomic implications from micro-level theory and evidence. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Columbia University, and his M.A. in Economics and B.S. in Material Science from Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea.

 

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Emerging Economy Consumers Drive Infrastructure Needs

By | May 4th, 2017|Advanced Economies, Economic research, Emerging Markets, Government, growth, IMF, infrastructure, Investment|

By Paolo Mauro

May 4, 2017

Versions in 中文 (Chinese), Français (French), 本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

The infrastructure needs of emerging market economies, like China or India, differ from those of advanced economies like the United States or Germany. Many emerging economies must substantially expand their energy and transportation networks, or build them from scratch, to accommodate rapid economic growth. Our research shows the more people make, the more they spend on transportation. With emerging economies’ middle classes booming and incomes rising, this has big implications for how policymakers choose to invest in infrastructure. Continue reading “Emerging Economy Consumers Drive Infrastructure Needs” »

Chart of the Week: The Cost of Asia’s Aging

By | May 1st, 2017|Advanced Economies, aging, Asia, capital markets, China, developing countries, Economic outlook, Emerging Markets, Employment, Global Governance, growth, health, inclusive growth, India, Japan, jobs, labor markets, Uncategorized|

By IMFBlog

May 1, 2017

Versions in 中文 (Chinese), Bahasa (Indonesia), and 本語 (Japanese) 

When it comes to tackling demographic change in Asia, there’s no one-size-fits-all strategy for policymakers. In some countries, like Japan, the population is aging rapidly, and the labor force is shrinking. In others, like the Philippines, young people are flooding the job market in search of work.

As our chart shows, the impact of aging could potentially drag down Japan’s average annual GDP growth by 1 percentage point over the next three decades. While in India and the Philippines, which have some of the youngest populations in the region, a growing workforce could potentially increase GDP by that same amount. Continue reading “Chart of the Week: The Cost of Asia’s Aging” »

IMF Spring Meetings 2017: Keeping Growth on Track

By | April 28th, 2017|Economic outlook, Emerging Markets, financial policy, Gender issues, Global Governance, Government, International Monetary Fund, jobs, Spring Meetings, technology|

By IMFBlog

April 28, 2017

Panelists, including IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde, discuss global gender challenges.

The world’s economic leaders and stakeholders came together at the 2017 IMF and World Bank Spring Meetings amid a more positive outlook on the global growth, which is forecast to hit its fastest pace in five years. A clear theme running through the meetings was the need to protect the growth momentum, given policy and political uncertainties, and to help ensure that everyone has the opportunity to share in the fruits of global integration and technological progress.

More than 10,000 people took part. In addition to central bankers, finance ministers and other officials, the meetings drew around 650 journalists, 160 parliamentarians from 68 countries, and a record 850 civil society representatives, who gathered to learn, listen, and share their points of view. Continue reading “IMF Spring Meetings 2017: Keeping Growth on Track” »

Five Keys to a Smart Fiscal Policy

By | April 19th, 2017|Advanced Economies, capital markets, developing countries, Economic outlook, Economic research, Emerging Markets, Financial markets, Fiscal policy, Global Governance, Globalization, growth, inclusive growth, Inequality, jobs, labor markets, monetary policy, productivity, technology, Uncategorized|

By Vitor Gaspar and Luc Eyraud

Versions in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

We live in a world of dramatic economic change. Rapid technological innovation has fundamentally reshaped the way we live and work. International trade and finance, migration, and worldwide communications have made countries more interconnected than ever, exposing workers to greater competition from abroad. While these changes have brought tremendous benefits, they have also led to a growing perception of uncertainty and insecurity, particularly in advanced economies.

Today’s conditions require new, more innovative solutions, which the IMF calls smart fiscal policies. By smart policies we mean policies that facilitate change, harness its growth potential, and protect people who are hurt by it. At the same time, excessive borrowing and record levels of public debt have limited the financial resources available to government. So, fiscal policy must do more with less. Fortunately, researchers and policy makers are realizing that the fiscal tool kit is broader and the tools more powerful than they thought. Five guiding principles sketch the contours of these smart fiscal policies, which are described in chapter one of the IMF’s April 2017 Fiscal Monitor. Continue reading “Five Keys to a Smart Fiscal Policy” »

Global Financial Stability Improves; Getting the Policy Mix Right to Sustain Gains

By | April 19th, 2017|capital flows, capital markets, China, developing countries, Economic outlook, Economic research, Emerging Markets, Employment, Europe, Financial markets, financial policy, Fiscal policy, growth, inclusive growth, Inequality, International Monetary Fund, labor markets, Low-income countries, monetary policy, productivity, Uncategorized|

By Tobias Adrian

Versions in 中文 (Chinese), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

The world’s financial system has become safer and more stable since our last assessment six months ago. Economic activity has gained momentum. The outlook has improved and hopes for reflation have risen. Monetary and financial conditions remain highly accommodative. And investor optimism over the new policies under discussion in the United States has boosted asset prices. These are some of the conclusions of the IMF’s latest Global Financial Stability Report

But it’s important for governments in the United States, Europe, China and elsewhere to follow through on investor expectations by adopting the right mix of policies. This means preventing fiscal imbalances, resisting calls for higher trade barriers, and maintaining global cooperation on regulations needed to make the financial system safer. Continue reading “Global Financial Stability Improves; Getting the Policy Mix Right to Sustain Gains” »

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