Need a new search?

If you didn't find what you were looking for, try a new search!

Ting Yan

By | February 22nd, 2018|

Ting Yan is Press Officer in the IMF's Communications Department, covering media relations in the Asia and Pacific region. Before joining the IMF, she was Deputy Editor-in-Chief in Wallstreetcn, a leading digital financial news service in China, and previously as Senior Financial Journalist in China Business News (CBN). Her reporting and commentary focused on global markets, monetary policies, and international organizations. She has traveled widely to cover major global financial conferences and interviewed numerous policymakers, business leaders, and academics. Ting has a Master’s degree in Development Administration and Planning from the University College London and a Bachelor’s degree in Finance from Fudan University in Shanghai.

Smartphones Drive New Global Tech Cycle, but Is Demand Peaking?

By | February 8th, 2018|Asia, banking, capital markets, China, commodities, developing countries, Economic research, exports, growth, imports, Investment, productivity, technology, trade|

By Benjamin Carton, Joannes Mongardini, and Yiqun Li

February 8, 2018

 Demand for smartphones is highly cyclical and related to the release of new models (photo: iStock by GettyImages).

Over a decade of spectacular growth, demand for smartphones has created a new global tech cycle that last year produced a new smartphone for every fifth person on earth.

This has created a complex and evolving supply chain across Asia, changing the export and growth performance of several countries. While our recent analysis of Chinese smartphone exports suggests that the global market may be saturated, demand for other electronics continues to support rising semiconductor production in Asia. Continue reading “Smartphones Drive New Global Tech Cycle, but Is Demand Peaking?” »

Chart of the Week: Inequality, Your Health, and Fiscal Policy

By | February 5th, 2018|Advanced Economies, China, Economic research, education, Emerging Markets, Environment, Fiscal, Fiscal policy, Global Governance, health, inclusive growth, India, Inequality, International Monetary Fund, Jobs, labor force, Low-income countries, productivity, U.S., unemployment, youth|

By Mercedes García-EscribanoBaoping Shang, and Emmanouil (Manos) Kitsios

February 5, 2018 

 Catania Sicily, Italy.  Men with a lower level of education live shorter lives, on average, than their better educated fellow citizens (photo: Jann Huizenga/Getty Images/IStock).

The gap in life expectancy between rich and poor people is a worldwide phenomenon, and has grown dramatically in recent years in some countries. 

In our Chart of the Week, we show how this longevity gap, which reflects inequality in access to health care and its impact on peoples’ overall health, varies across countries. Men with a lower level of education live shorter lives, on average, than their better educated fellow citizens: this gap ranges from four years in Italy, to 14 years in Hungary, according to the October 2017 Fiscal Monitor. Continue reading “Chart of the Week: Inequality, Your Health, and Fiscal Policy” »

5 Things You Need to Know About Inequality

By | January 23rd, 2018|Advanced Economies, developing countries, Economic outlook, Economic research, Emerging Markets, Fiscal, Fiscal policy, Global Governance, Globalization, inclusive growth, income, Inequality, International Monetary Fund, labor markets, Poverty, structural reforms|

By IMFBlog

January 23, 2018

Versions in عربي (Arabic),  中文  (Chinese), Español (Spanish), Français (French),  Русский (Russian)

A man with donations from a food bank in Los Angeles, California: inequality within countries is on the rise, including in advanced economies like the United States (photo: Lucy Nicholson/Newscom).

Tackling inequality is not only a moral imperative. It is critical for sustaining growth.

Global income inequality has declined in recent years, with the Gini index—a statistical measure of income distribution with a value of zero indicating perfect equality—dropping from 68 in 1988 to 62 in 2013, reflecting relatively strong growth in many emerging and developing economies, particularly in China and India. However, inequality has increased within many countries, including in many advanced economies. Continue reading “5 Things You Need to Know About Inequality” »

The Current Economic Sweet Spot Is Not the “New Normal”

By | January 22nd, 2018|Advanced Economies, banking, capital flows, capital markets, China, climate change, commodities, Economic Crisis, Economic outlook, Economic research, Employment, Environment, euro zone, Europe, exchange rates, exports, Finance, Financial Crisis, Financial markets, Fiscal, Fiscal policy, Government, growth, IMF, imports, inclusive growth, income, Inequality, International Monetary Fund, Investment, Jobs, labor markets, Low-income countries, monetary policy, South America, taxation, technology, trade, U.S., Uncategorized, unemployment, wages|

By Maurice Obstfeld

January 22, 2018

Versions in عربي (Arabic),  中文 (Chinese),  Español (Spanish), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese),  Русский (Russian)

Global growth continues to pick up and is broad based. But no matter how tempting it is to sit back and enjoy the sunshine, policy can and should move to strengthen the recovery (photo: Mumbai, India, Ingram Publishing/Newscom).

As the year 2018 begins, the world economy is gathering speed. The new World Economic Outlook Update revises our forecast for the world economy’s growth in both 2018 and 2019 to 3.9 percent. For both years, that is 0.2 percentage points higher than last October’s forecast, and 0.2 percentage points higher than our current estimate of last year’s global growth. Continue reading “The Current Economic Sweet Spot Is Not the “New Normal”” »

Slowly but Surely, a Farewell to Fossil Fuels

By | January 18th, 2018|Advanced Economies, China, climate change, developing countries, Environment, Government, income, Jobs, U.S.|

By IMFBlog

January 19, 2018

Repairs to an oil rig in North Dakota, United States: Eighty percent of the world’s energy consumption is based on fossil fuels (photo: North Dakota/Jim Gehrz/MCT/Newscom).

This has never happened before. Never. Three years of stagnating carbon dioxide emissions coupled with relatively healthy global economic growth. In this podcast , International Energy Agency Chief Economist Laszlo Varro talks about leaving fossil fuels in the past. Continue reading “Slowly but Surely, a Farewell to Fossil Fuels” »

Top Ten Charts of the Week: 2017

By | January 3rd, 2018|Africa, climate change, Economic outlook, Economic research, Emerging Markets, Environment, euro zone, Europe, Finance, Globalization, Government, growth, income, Inequality, International Monetary Fund, Jobs, labor markets, Low-income countries, technology, Uncategorized|

By IMFBlog

January 3, 2017

The top 10 charts of the week of 2017 help illuminate the uncharted waters ahead for the global economy  (photo: Kotka, Finland-Newspix24/SipaUS/Newscom).

In the Spring of 2017, we began our Chart of the Week feature on the blog: snapshots in time and over time of how economies work, to help illuminate the uncharted waters ahead for the global economy.

Here are the top ten Charts of the Week of 2017, based on your readership. Continue reading “Top Ten Charts of the Week: 2017” »

Nathan Porter

By | December 19th, 2017|

Nathan Porter is the Deputy Chief of the Emerging Markets Division of the IMF’s Strategy, Policy and Review Department. In this role he has led work on the reform of the IMF’s lending instruments, efforts to strengthen the Global Financial Safety Net, as well as the assessment of international reserve needs and EM vulnerabilities and risks more generally. Previously, he worked on the IMF’s programs with Iceland and Ireland, and the teams covering China, Hong Kong, and a number of other Asia-Pacific economies. Before joining the IMF he worked at the Australian Treasury, and he holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania.

 

Latest Post:

Strength in Numbers: A Safety Net to Prevent Crises in the Global Economy

By | December 19th, 2017|Advanced Economies, capital markets, China, Economic outlook, Economic research, Emerging Markets, Financing, Global Governance, Globalization, Government, inclusive growth, India, International Monetary Fund, Investment, trade|

By IMFBlog

December 19, 2017

Version in عربي (Arabic);  中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish),  Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese),  Русский (Russian)

Walking on a safety net: countries need insurance in bad economic and financial times (photo: Vivek Prakash/Newscom).

If you are lucky, when the going gets tough, you have a group of people you can rely on to help you through a crisis. Countries are no different—a safety net to help them in bad economic and financial times can make the difference in peoples’ lives.   Continue reading “Strength in Numbers: A Safety Net to Prevent Crises in the Global Economy” »

Propping Up the Chinese Economy: Credit versus Fiscal Stimulus

By | December 12th, 2017|Asia, banking, China, Economic research, Finance, Financing, Fiscal, Fiscal policy, Fiscal Stimulus, Government, IMF, Investment|

By Sophia Chen and Lev Ratnovski

December 13, 2017

Version in 中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish), 日本語  (Japanese)

Construction work Qingyuan , Guangdong, China : Fiscal stimulus is a powerful tool for growth (photo: Imagine China/Newscom).

Credit booms are addictive. Credit supports growth and the perception of wealth. Yet credit booms are risky, and are often followed by financial busts and economic slowdowns. The challenge is taming credit without hurting growth. Continue reading “Propping Up the Chinese Economy: Credit versus Fiscal Stimulus” »

Load More Posts