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The Global Expansion: Still Strong but Less Even, More Fragile, Under Threat

By | July 16th, 2018|Advanced Economies, Africa, developing countries, Economic outlook, Emerging Markets, Financial markets, Spring Meetings, trade|

By Maurice Obstfeld

July 16, 2018

Versions in عربيBaˈhasa indoneˈsia中文EspañolFrançais日本語PortuguêsРусский 

The escalation of trade tensions is the greatest near-term threat to global growth (photo: wildpixel/Getty Images by iStock)

Amid rising tensions over international trade, the broad global expansion that began roughly two years ago has plateaued and become less balanced. Continue reading “The Global Expansion: Still Strong but Less Even, More Fragile, Under Threat” »

Economic Preparedness: The Need for Fiscal Space

By | June 27th, 2018|Advanced Economies, capital markets, Debt Relief, Economic research, Emerging Markets, Fiscal, Fiscal discipline, Fiscal policy, Fiscal Stimulus, structural reforms|

By Vikram Haksar, Marialuz Moreno-Badia, Catherine Pattillo and Murtaza Syed

June 27, 2018

Versions in عربي中文Baˈhasa indoneˈsia,  日本語Português

Countries must assess the amount of room in their budgets for increasing spending or cutting taxes (photo: Martin Barraud/iStock by Getty Images)

How much leeway national policymakers have for increasing spending or cutting taxes has been hard to assess. Continue reading “Economic Preparedness: The Need for Fiscal Space” »

How the Commodity Boom Helped Tackle Poverty and Inequality in Latin America

By | June 21st, 2018|Advanced Economies, education, Emerging Markets, inclusive growth, Inequality, Investment, Latin America, Poverty, taxation, wages|

By Ravi Balakrishnan and Frederik Toscani

June 21, 2018 

Versions in Español, Português

People buying produce in a busy market in Bahia, Brazil. During the commodity boom, Brazil saw significant reductions in poverty and inequality (photo: golero/iStock by Getty Images)

Latin America may be the most unequal region in the world, but it is the only region to significantly lower inequality over the past two decades, and the boom in commodity prices helped make it happen.  Continue reading “How the Commodity Boom Helped Tackle Poverty and Inequality in Latin America” »

5 Things You Need to Know About the IMF and Climate Change

By | June 8th, 2018|Advanced Economies, climate change, developing countries, Emerging Markets, Europe, Fiscal policy, G-20, Global Governance, India, International Monetary Fund, Low-income countries, natural disasters, Oil|

By Ian Parry

June 8, 2018

Versions in  عربي,  中文,  Español, Français, 日本語Português, Русский 

A polar bear on shrinking ice in the Arctic: climate change means the world is getting hotter (photo: Sven-Erik Arndt/Newscom)

The world is getting hotter, resulting in rising sea levels, more extreme weather like hurricanes, droughts, and floods, as well as other risks to the global climate like the irreversible collapsing of ice sheets.  Continue reading “5 Things You Need to Know About the IMF and Climate Change” »

Chart of the Week: Distribution of Globalization’s Gains

By | May 31st, 2018|Advanced Economies, China, developing countries, Emerging Markets, Globalization, Government, inclusive growth, India, Inequality, U.S.|

By IMFBlog

May 31, 2018

A garment factory in Ethiopia, which globalization has helped to boost its growth (photo: Kay Neitfeld/Newscom).

While globalization is generally good for economic growth, the benefits are subject to diminishing marginal returns, according to a recent study of 147 countries from 1970 to 2014. The study looks at how globalization affects the distribution of incomes across and within countries.   Continue reading “Chart of the Week: Distribution of Globalization’s Gains” »

Chart of the Week: Greenery and Prosperity

By | May 21st, 2018|Advanced Economies, Africa, Asia, climate change, developing countries, Economic outlook, Economic research, Emerging Markets, IMF, income, International Monetary Fund, Investment, Low-income countries, natural disasters, taxation, U.S., Uncategorized|

By João Tovar Jalles and Prakash Loungani

May 21, 2018

Versions in  中文, Español, Français, 日本語,  Português 

Brandenburg, Germany: in three advanced economies—Germany, the United Kingdom, and France—emissions have fallen despite the increase in incomes (photo: Caro / Kaiser/Newscom).

Economic growth has traditionally moved in tandem with pollution. But can countries break this link and manage to grow while lowering pollution?

Continue reading “Chart of the Week: Greenery and Prosperity” »

Mounting Debt Threatens Sustainable Development Goals

By | April 27th, 2018|capital markets, corruption, Debt Relief, Financial markets, Global Governance, IMF, inclusive growth, Inequality, Infrastructure, Investment, Public debt, Reform, taxation, trade|

By Chris Lane and Elliott Harris

April 27, 2018

Versions in baˈhasa indoneˈsia(Indonesian), Español (Spanish), Français (French), Português (Portuguese)

A market in Port-au-Prince, Haiti: some developing countries are falling behind when it comes to incomes (photo: Dumont Bildarchiv/Newscom).

In 2015, 193 countries adopted the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as an overarching policy roadmap through 2030. These goals are predicated on the idea that for a sustainable future, economic growth must go hand-in-hand with social inclusion and protection of the environment.

Our respective institutions, the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF), fully support these goals. From the UN perspective, they represent a down payment on a more peaceful, prosperous, and cooperative world, especially in increasingly perilous times. For the IMF, they help underpin economic stability and sustainable and inclusive economic growth. Continue reading “Mounting Debt Threatens Sustainable Development Goals” »

Bringing Down High Debt

By | April 18th, 2018|Advanced Economies, banking, China, credit, developing countries, Economic Crisis, Economic outlook, Economic research, Emerging Markets, Europe, Fiscal, Fiscal discipline, Fiscal policy, Fiscal Stimulus, Government, growth, income, Low-income countries, Politics, Public debt, recession, Reform, taxation, U.S., Uncategorized|

By Vitor Gaspar and Laura Jaramillo

April 18, 2018

Versions in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese),  Español (Spanish), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Português (Portuguese), Русский (Russian)

High debt makes governments’ financing vulnerable to sudden changes in market sentiment (photo: NYSE-LUCAS JACKSON-REUTERS Newscom).

Global debt hit a new record high of $164 trillion in 2016, the equivalent of 225 percent of global GDP. Both private and public debt have surged over the past decade. High debt makes government’s financing vulnerable to sudden changes in market sentiment. It also limits a government’s ability to provide support to the economy in the event of a downturn or a financial crisis.

Countries should use the window of opportunity afforded by the economic upswing to strengthen the state of their fiscal affairs. The April 2018 Fiscal Monitor explores how countries can reduce government deficits and debt in a growth-friendly way.

Continue reading “Bringing Down High Debt” »

Global Economy: Good News for Now but Trade Tensions a Threat

By | April 17th, 2018|Advanced Economies, China, commodities, developing countries, Economic outlook, Economic research, Emerging Markets, exports, Fiscal Stimulus, growth, labor force, monetary policy, Spring Meetings, structural reforms, trade, U.S.|

By Maurice Obstfeld

April 17, 2018

Versions in عربي (Arabic),  baˈhasa indoneˈsia (Indonesian), 中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Português (Portuguese), Русский (Russian)

Container ship in Colombo, Sri Lanka: the recent escalating tensions over trade present a growing risk to the global economy (photo: STRINGER/REUTERS/Newscom).

The world economy continues to show broad-based momentum. Against that positive backdrop, the prospect of a similarly broad-based conflict over trade presents a jarring picture.

Three months ago, we updated our global growth forecast for this year and next substantially, to 3.9 percent in both years. That forecast is being borne out by continuing strong performance in the euro area, Japan, China, and the United States, all of which grew above expectations last year. We also project near-term improvements for several other emerging market and developing economies, including some recovery in commodity exporters. Continuing to power the world economy’s upswing are accelerations in investment and, notably, in trade. Continue reading “Global Economy: Good News for Now but Trade Tensions a Threat” »

Globalization Helps Spread Knowledge and Technology Across Borders

By | April 9th, 2018|Advanced Economies, capital markets, commodities, Economic outlook, Emerging Markets, Globalization, inclusive growth, labor force, productivity, Spring Meetings, technology|

By Aqib Aslam, Johannes Eugster, Giang Ho, Florence Jaumotte, Carolina Osorio-Buitron, and Roberto Piazza

April 9, 2018

Versions in  عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Português (Portuguese), Русский (Russian)

Using artificial intelligence at a hospital in Qingdao, China: the spread of knowledge and technology between countries has intensified (photo: Sipa Asia/Sipa USA/Newscom).

It took 1,000 years for the invention of paper to spread from China to Europe. Nowadays, in a world that has become more integrated, innovations spread faster and through many channels.

Our research in Chapter 4 of the April 2018 World Economic Outlook takes a closer look at how technology travels between countries. We find that the spread of knowledge and technology across borders has intensified because of globalization. In emerging markets, the transfer of technology has helped to boost innovation and productivity even in the recent period of weak global productivity growth. Continue reading “Globalization Helps Spread Knowledge and Technology Across Borders” »

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