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Gaining Currency: The Rise of the Renminbi

By | August 4th, 2017|Asia, China, currency, Emerging Markets, Financial markets, Financial regulation, growth, International Monetary Fund, Investment, Reform, Uncategorized|

By IMFBlog

August 4, 2017

Eswar Prasad at an IMF conference (photo: Staff/IMF)

 
As China’s economy catches up in size with that of the United States, some economists predict that the renminbi will soon challenge the dollar’s dominance in international finance.

Continue reading “Gaining Currency: The Rise of the Renminbi” »

Chart of the Week: Electric Takeover in Transportation

By | July 31st, 2017|Advanced Economies, Asia, China, climate change, developing countries, Emerging Markets, Environment, India, International Monetary Fund, oil, technology, U.S.|

By IMFBlog

July 31, 2017 

An electric car recharges at a meter in London: The UK is the latest country to announce plans to end fossil fuel vehicle sales by 2040 (photo: Sasha Fox Walters/iStock by Getty Images)

The switch from horses to automobiles in the 20th century paved the way for the rise of oil-based transportation and energy use. Today, electric vehicle ownership is picking up speed. Greater affordability of electric vehicles will likely steer us away from our current sources of energy for transportation, and toward more environmentally friendly technology. And that can happen sooner than you think.

Our Chart of the Week from a recent IMF working paper shows that the transition away from motor vehicles could happen in the next 10 to 25 years, based on parallel shifts in the 20th century. Patterns observed in the early days of the horse-car transition closely resemble present-day electric vehicle adoption rates. Between 2011 and 2015, the average annual growth rate of electric vehicle ownership was 120 percent. This is, in fact, slightly faster growth than that of motor vehicles during a comparable timeframe in the past. Using the horse-car parallel, the paper forecasts that by 2040 motor vehicles could mostly disappear in advanced economies, and could comprise about a third of the fleet of all cars in emerging market and developing economies. Continue reading “Chart of the Week: Electric Takeover in Transportation” »

Latest Outlook for The Americas: Back on Cruise Control, But Stuck in Low Gear

By | July 25th, 2017|capital flows, capital markets, Caribbean, commodities, Economic outlook, Economic research, education, Employment, Global Governance, Government, growth, inclusive growth, income, infrastructure, International Monetary Fund, labor markets, Latin America, Politics, productivity, structural reforms|

By Alejandro Werner

July 25, 2017

Versions in Español (Spanish), Português (Portuguese)

Shopping mall in Viña del Mar, Chile: Latin America is expected to recover gradually as most economies continue to face weak domestic demand (photo: Rodrigo Garrido/Newscom)

After disappointing growth over the past few years, economic activity in Latin America remains on track to recover gradually in 2017–18 as recessions in a few countries—notably Argentina and Brazil—are coming to an end. Our latest projections show the region growing by 1 percent in 2017 and 1.9 percent in 2018.

But amid low confidence, domestic demand continues to remain weak across most economies, and is expected to only recover slowly as actual output catches up to potential and internal sources of growth build strength, based on a decline in political and policy uncertainty across some major economies. Some countries in the region will need clear strategies to adjust further following a permanent loss in commodity revenues. Continue reading “Latest Outlook for The Americas: Back on Cruise Control, But Stuck in Low Gear” »

A Firming Recovery

By | July 23rd, 2017|banking, capital flows, China, climate change, developing countries, Economic outlook, Emerging Markets, Employment, Environment, Europe, Financial markets, Fiscal, Fiscal policy, Globalization, growth, IMF, income, Inequality, inflation, Investment, Japan, jobs, labor force, labor markets, Low-income countries, Public debt, trade, Uncategorized, unemployment, wages|

By Maurice Obstfeld

July 24, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic), Bahasa (Indonesian),  中文 (Chinese), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

(photo: IMF)

The recovery in global growth that we projected in April is on a firmer footing; there is now no question mark over the world economy’s gain in momentum.

As in our April forecast, the World Economic Outlook Update projects  3.5 percent growth in global output for this year and 3.6 percent for next.

The distribution of this growth around the world has changed, however: compared with last April’s projection, some economies are up but others are down, offsetting those improvements. Continue reading “A Firming Recovery” »

No Time to Stand Still: Strengthening Global Growth and Building Inclusive Economies

By | July 5th, 2017|Advanced Economies, aging, Asia, developing countries, Economic outlook, Economic research, Emerging Markets, G-20, Global Governance, inclusive growth, Inequality, International Monetary Fund, jobs, technology, U.S.|

By Christine Lagarde

July 5, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese), Français (French), Deutsch (German), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

The port of Hamburg, Germany: G20 leaders meet to discuss policies to strengthen the global economic recovery (photo: Markus Lange/robertharding/Newscom)

Nearly sixty years ago, a little-known band called the Beatles arrived in Hamburg, got a haircut, recorded their first song, and found their sound.

Taking a cue from the Fab Four, world leaders gathering for the Group of Twenty Summit this week can make the most of their time in Hamburg—and leave Germany with a sound plan to strengthen global growth.

Continue reading “No Time to Stand Still: Strengthening Global Growth and Building Inclusive Economies” »

Fintech: Capturing the Benefits, Avoiding the Risks

By | June 20th, 2017|Advanced Economies, capital flows, capital markets, Economic outlook, Economic research, education, Emerging Markets, exports, Globalization, IMF, imports, inclusive growth, Investment, labor markets, productivity, technology, Transition|

By Christine Lagarde

June 20, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

A signboard at a store in Guangzhou, China, lists various forms of mobile payment (photo: Imagine China/Newscom)

When you send an email, it takes one click of the mouse to deliver a message next door or across the planet. Gone are the days of special airmail stationery and colorful stamps to send letters abroad.

International payments are different. Destination still matters. You might use cash to pay for a cup of tea at a local shop, but not to order tea leaves from distant Sri Lanka. Depending on the carrier, the tea leaves might arrive before the seller can access the payment. Continue reading “Fintech: Capturing the Benefits, Avoiding the Risks” »

Chart of the Week: Why Energy Prices Matter

By | June 5th, 2017|Advanced Economies, Environment, Fiscal policy, growth, health, IMF, infrastructure, Investment, technology, Uncategorized|

By IMFBlog

June 5, 2017

Versions in   عربي (Arabic),  中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish)

(photo: Imagine China/Newscom)

Wind turbines and solar panels generate electricity at power station, Jiangsu, China. Getting energy prices right will help reduce environmental costs and save lives (photo: Imagine China/Newscom)

World Environment Day is an occasion to consider why it’s so important to get energy prices right. The IMF has long argued that energy prices that reflect environmental costs can help governments achieve their goals not only for improving public health but also for inclusive growth and sound public finances.  

A number of countries such as Egypt, Indonesia, Mexico, and Saudi Arabia have recently taken important steps to increase energy prices towards market levels. Some others, such as India and China have made important strides in cost-effective renewable energy sources—and reduced their reliance on fossil fuels. Still, undercharging for fossil fuel energy remains pervasive and substantial and can cause severe health effects from pollution, particularly in densely populated countries. Continue reading “Chart of the Week: Why Energy Prices Matter” »

Tomorrow’s Workplace

By | May 31st, 2017|education, Employment, Gender issues, IMF, income, labor force, U.S., unemployment, youth|

By Camilla Lund Andersen

May 31, 2017

It seems fitting that we are launching our redesigned magazine with a cover dedicated to millennials and the future of work. But while Finance & Development has mainly changed its appearance, not its content, young adults may have to make more fundamental adjustments to keep pace with the requirements of tomorrow’s workplace. Millennials face myriad challenges as they seek to carve out a prosperous future for themselves.

Continue reading “Tomorrow’s Workplace” »

JaeBin Ahn

By | May 22nd, 2017|

 JaeBin Ahn is an economist in the Open Economy Macroeconomics Division of the IMF's Research Department, covering external sector assessment issues. Prior to this position, he was in the IMF's Asia and Pacific Department, covering Indonesia and Malaysia. Before joining the IMF’s Economist Program, he was a dissertation intern at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. His area of research includes international trade and finance, with particular interest in deriving macroeconomic implications from micro-level theory and evidence. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Columbia University, and his M.A. in Economics and B.S. in Material Science from Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea.

 

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