China’s Housing Market: Defying the Odds?

by iMFdirect

Housing is on everyone’s mind. The collapse of housing bubbles can be very costly.

  • In Japan, house prices rose by about 40 percent during the mid-1980s; the collapse was followed by a ‘lost decade’ in which incomes did not grow and house prices fell by over 40 percent.
  • In the United States, house prices increased by about 30 percent between 2001 and 2006; their collapse was followed by the global financial crisis.

Continue reading “China’s Housing Market: Defying the Odds?” »

By | February 1st, 2016|Financial Crisis, IMF, International Monetary Fund, U.S.|

The Specter of Risk in the Derivatives of Bond Mutual Funds

By Fabio Cortes

Current regulations only require U.S. and European bond mutual funds to disclose a limited amount of information about the risks they have taken using financial instruments called derivatives. This leaves investors and policymakers in the dark on a key issue for financial stability.  Our new research in the October 2015 Global Financial Stability Report looks at just how much is at stake.  Continue reading “The Specter of Risk in the Derivatives of Bond Mutual Funds” »

By | December 17th, 2015|Economic research, Europe, Financial markets, International Monetary Fund, U.S.|
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