Helping Feed the World’s Fast-Growing Population

rabah-arezki-imfBy Rabah Arezki

Agriculture and food markets are plagued with inefficiencies that have dramatic consequences for the welfare of the world’s most vulnerable populations. Globally, farm subsidies amount to over $560 billion a year—equivalent to nearly four times the aid given to developing countries by richer ones. Major emerging-market nations have increased subsidies rapidly, even as rich nations cut theirs drastically. Meanwhile, tariffs on farm products remain a major point of contention in global trade talks.

One third of global food production goes to waste, while food insecurity is still rampant in developing countries. Even with the explosion of agricultural productivity since the middle of the 20th century, food security remains a challenge for much of the developing world. Food-calorie production will have to expand by 70 percent by 2050 to keep up with a global population that’s forecast to grow to 9.7 billion from last year’s 7.3 billion. Food insecurity can lead to violence and conflicts that can spill over well beyond borders.  Continue reading “Helping Feed the World’s Fast-Growing Population” »

Enhancing Monetary Policy Flexibility Through `De-dollarization’

By Marcello Estevão and Greetje Everaert

Version in Español (Spanish)

Borrowing and saving in foreign currencies—so-called dollarization—seem like a rational response by citizens in some emerging market economies to financial crises and runaway inflation. But dollarization usually persists many years after the problems that triggered it are alleviated and limits the effect that central banks can have on economic activity and inflation. Continue reading “Enhancing Monetary Policy Flexibility Through `De-dollarization’” »

By | September 21st, 2016|International Monetary Fund, South America, trade, Uncategorized|

Oil Exporters Learn to Live with Cheaper Oil

By Martin Sommer, Juan Treviño, and Neil Hickey

Version in  عربي (Arabic)

The significant and prolonged drop in oil prices since mid-2014 has changed the fortunes of many energy-exporting nations around the world. This applies particularly to countries of the Middle East and Central Asia, because these regions are home to 11 of the world’s top 20 energy exporters.

Continue reading “Oil Exporters Learn to Live with Cheaper Oil” »

By | June 8th, 2016|growth, IMF, International Monetary Fund, trade, Uncategorized|

Countries Are Signing Up for Sizeable Carbon Prices

Ian Parry-IMFBy Ian Parry

Versions in: عربي Arabic, 中文 Chinese, Français French, 日本語 Japanese,  Русский Russian, and Español Spanish

With global leaders set to start signing the landmark Paris Agreement on climate change tomorrow—April 22 is Earth Day—at the United Nations in New York, countries will embark on the potentially difficult and contentious issue of setting prices for greenhouse gas emissions, most importantly carbon dioxide (CO2). Our back of the envelope calculations show that most large emitters will need to charge anywhere from $50 to $100 per ton or more (in current prices) by 2030 to meet their commitments to reduce carbon emissions.

Continue reading “Countries Are Signing Up for Sizeable Carbon Prices” »

By | April 21st, 2016|climate change, health, International Monetary Fund, oil, technology, trade|

Competitiveness in Sub-Saharan Africa: Time to Move Ahead

Antoinette Sayeh2

By Antoinette Sayeh

(Versions in EspañolFrançais, and Português)

The sub-Saharan Africa region is facing severe shocks associated with the steep decline in commodity prices and tightening global financial conditions. Against this background, it’s a good time to look back at the region’s recent growth experience and examine the relationship between growth rates and competitiveness. The extent to which sub-Saharan African companies are able to compete against their foreign competitors (that is, the extent to which they are competitive) could indeed play a role in sustaining growth going ahead.

Continue reading “Competitiveness in Sub-Saharan Africa: Time to Move Ahead” »

By | January 28th, 2016|Africa, Economic outlook, growth, International Monetary Fund, trade|
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