New Data on Global Debt

2019-03-13T10:35:33-05:00January 2, 2019|

January 2, 2019

Pedestrians in the snow in Tokyo, Japan: the country is one of the top three borrowers in the world (photo: Morio Taga/Newscom)


Until recently, we had a partial view of global debt. Our new update to the IMF’s Global Debt Database, first made public in May 2018, now fills even more of the gaps. We have compiled data on public and private debt for 190 countries, dating back to 1950, which now includes the latest numbers for 2017.

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Top 10 Blogs of 2018

2019-03-13T10:39:54-05:00December 28, 2018|

By IMFBlog

December 28, 2018

New Year’s eve fireworks in London, England: read our top ten blogs of 2018 (photo: Ben Cawthra/Newscom)

In 2018, the blogs that caught our readers’ collective eye were about the enduring forces molding the global economy: Brexit, crypto assets, debt, and housing prices, to name a few.  (more…)

Five Actions to Strengthen the Euro Area Banking Union

2019-03-13T10:49:35-05:00December 14, 2018|

By Atilla Arda, Daniel Hardy, and Maike B. Luedersen

December 14, 2018

Français, Italiano

View of skyscrapers in the banking district in Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Progress has been made, but more needs to be done to strengthen the euro area’s banking union (photo: imageBROKER/Stefan Ziese/Newscom)

Dealing with problem banks in a prompt, efficient, and even-handed manner is essential for the European banking union. (more…)

The Uneven Path Ahead: The Effect of Brexit on Different Sectors in the UK Economy

2019-03-13T10:57:28-05:00December 4, 2018|

By Jiaqian Chen

December 4, 2018

عربي, 中文Español, Français日本語,  PortuguêsРусский

A UK border agency worker holds a passport: As a member of the European Union, free labor mobility has enabled the UK to hire talent from across the EU (photo: Mac Gregor/Reuters/Newscom)

The United Kingdom is set to leave the European Union in March 2019. Our research suggests that all likely Brexit outcomes will entail an economic cost for the UK, and these costs would be unevenly spread across different sectors and regions. (more…)

A Planet at Risk Requires Multilateral Action

2019-03-13T11:01:39-05:00December 3, 2018|

Signe Krogstrup and Maurice Obstfeld

 December 3, 2018

عربي, 中文Español, Français,  日本語Português, Русский

A wolf in the snow: the planet isn’t crying wolf as man’s economic activities reach a scale where the global climate is at risk (photo: ImageBroker/ David MichaSheldon/Newscom)

The COP-21 Paris Agreement limiting greenhouse gas emissions was a major achievement on the road to meeting the threat of climate change. But as the evidence becomes increasingly unambiguous that human activity is destabilizing the Earth’s climate and biosphere, policymakers will need to do more. (more…)

Chart of the Week: Grading the G-20 on its Growth Goals

2019-03-13T11:50:42-05:00November 19, 2018|

By Helge Berger and Margaux MacDonald

November 19, 2018 

Español, Português

Growth is stronger in the G-20 but progress toward more balanced, sustainable, and inclusive growth is slow (photo: Egon Bömsch imageBROKER/Newscom)

This blog is dedicated to the memory of Giang Ho, an IMF economist who died suddenly this past August. Her efforts and ingenuity were critical to carrying out this analytical work. We miss her and will never forget her. 
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Chart of the Week: Financial Reform Report Card

2019-03-13T12:23:50-05:00October 29, 2018|

By Tobias Adrian, Dirk Jan Grolleman, and Anastasiia Morozova

October 29, 2018

Countries have improved banking sector regulation considerably in the past decade, but areas of weakness remain (Steve Gottlieb/Newscom)

The many 10th anniversary retrospectives of the global financial crisis mostly agree: the financial system is safer today than it was when US investment bank Lehman Brothers collapsed in 2008. (more…)

Chart of the Week: Government Debt Is Not the Whole Story: Look at the Assets

2019-03-13T12:26:49-05:00October 23, 2018|

By IMFBlog

October 23, 2018

The Millennium Bridge in London, England: governments often don’t include the value of their assets, like bridges and roads, as well as natural resources, when they measure public wealth (Ingram Publishing/Newscom)

Lost track of your personal finances?  You are not alone.  Your government has often lost track of its finances too.  While it keeps close tabs on debt, it is less clear on how much it owns: the assets. (more…)

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