Top 10 Charts of the Week for 2018

2019-01-07T08:04:55+00:00January 7, 2019|

By IMFBlog

January 7, 2019

Looking ahead (photo: Newsis/Reuters/Newscom)

A picture is worth a thousand words.  The portraits of the global economy in our Chart of the Week series have proven a hit, and to help you start the year with just the right facts and figures, we have pulled together your top reads of 2018.  (more…)

Chart of the Week: Grading the G-20 on its Growth Goals

2018-11-19T15:42:58+00:00November 19, 2018|

By Helge Berger and Margaux MacDonald

November 19, 2018 

Español, Português

Growth is stronger in the G-20 but progress toward more balanced, sustainable, and inclusive growth is slow (photo: Egon Bömsch imageBROKER/Newscom)

This blog is dedicated to the memory of Giang Ho, an IMF economist who died suddenly this past August. Her efforts and ingenuity were critical to carrying out this analytical work. We miss her and will never forget her. 
(more…)

The Wealth of Nations: Governments Can Better Manage What They Own and Owe

2018-10-25T15:23:26+00:00October 9, 2018|

By Vitor Gaspar, Jason Harris, and Alexander Tieman

October 10, 2018

عربي,中文, Español, FrançaisBaˈhasa indoneˈsia, 日本語PortuguêsРусский

A firefighter in Auckland, New Zealand: when governments know what they own they can put their assets to better use and can earn about 3 percent of GDP more in revenues to spend on citizens’ well being (Photo: Rafael Ben-Ari/Newscom)

What is the state of your personal finances? You probably think first about your debts: your mortgage, your credit card balance, and your student loans. But you probably also think about how much cash is sitting in the bank, the value of your house, and the rest of your nest egg.

Surprisingly, most governments do not approach their finances this way. (more…)

The Financial System Is Stronger, but New Vulnerabilities Have Emerged in the Decade Since the Crisis

2018-10-12T10:07:48+00:00October 9, 2018|

By Tobias Adrian

October 10, 2018

عربي, 中文, Español, Français, Baˈhasa indoneˈsia, 日本語PortuguêsРусский

Debt owed by governments, companies and households in economies with globally systemically important financial sectors has risen since the global financial crisis (Photo: Richard B. Levine/Newscom)

Although the global expansion has plateaued, easy monetary policies continue to support growth. But we shouldn’t rest too easily. Chapter 1 of the latest Global Financial Stability Report finds that short-term risks to the financial system have increased somewhat over the past six months. (more…)

Global Growth Plateaus as Economic Risks Materialize

2018-10-10T12:39:46+00:00October 8, 2018|

By Maurice Obstfeld

October 9, 2018

عربي中文, Español, FrançaisBaˈhasa indoneˈsia, 日本語, Русский

Uncertainty over trade policy is becoming a drag on economic activity (photo: Imagine China/Newscom)

The latest World Economic Outlook report projects that global growth will remain steady over 2018–19 at last year’s rate of 3.7 percent. This growth exceeds that achieved in any of the years between 2012 and 2016. It occurs as many economies have reached or are nearing full employment and as earlier deflationary fears have dissipated. Thus, policymakers still have an excellent opportunity to build resilience and implement growth-enhancing reforms.

(more…)

Lasting Effects: The Global Economic Recovery 10 Years After the Crisis

2018-10-12T10:10:34+00:00October 3, 2018|

By Wenjie Chen, Mico Mrkaic, and Malhar Nabar

October 3, 2018

عربي,中文, Español, Français, Baˈhasa indoneˈsia, 日本語, Português, Русский

Woman cleaning in Berlin, Germany: the 2008 global financial crisis has had long-lasting effects on economic growth (photo: Caro/Olaf Jandke/Newscom)

In the year following the 2008 financial crisis, economic activity declined in half of all countries in the world. Our analysis in Chapter 2 of the October World Economic Outlook shows that in many countries output is still well below levels that would have prevailed had output followed its precrisis trend. (more…)

A Decade After Lehman, the Financial System Is Safer. Now We Must Avoid Reform Fatigue

2018-10-17T10:50:27+00:00October 3, 2018|

By Adolfo Barajas, Claudio Raddatz, and James P. Walsh

October 3, 2018

عربي中文,  Español,  Français, Baˈhasa indoneˈsia日本語, PortuguêsРусский

A ticker in New York’s Times Square flashes the news of the collapse of Lehman Brothers on September 15, 2008: In the decade since, the financial sector has  strengthened considerably, but the reform agenda remains incomplete (Photo: Joshua Lott/Reuters/Newscom)

In the decade since the collapse of US investment bank Lehman Brothers sparked the most severe economic crisis since the Great Depression, regulation and supervision of the financial sector have been strengthened considerably. This has reduced the risk of another crisis, with all its attendant woes—unemployment, foreclosures, bankruptcies. But a new risk has emerged: reform fatigue. (more…)

Load More Posts