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Maurice Obstfeld

2019-04-29T09:24:15-05:00September 30, 2015|

maury-obstfeld-imfMaurice Obstfeld is the Economic Counsellor and Director of Research at the International Monetary Fund, on leave from the University of California, Berkeley. At Berkeley, he is the Class of 1958 Professor of Economics and formerly Chair of the Department of Economics (1998-2001). He arrived at Berkeley in 1991 as a professor, following permanent appointments at Columbia (1979-1986) and the University of Pennsylvania (1986-1989), and a visiting appointment at Harvard (1989-90). He received his Ph.D. in economics from MIT in 1979 after attending the University of Pennsylvania (B.A., 1973) and King’s College, Cambridge University (M.A., 1975).

From July 2014 to August 2015, Dr. Obstfeld served as a Member of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers. He was previously (2002-2014) an honorary advisor to the Bank of Japan's Institute of Monetary and Economic Studies. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Among Dr. Obstfeld's honors are Tilburg University’s Tjalling Koopmans Asset Award, the John von Neumann Award of the Rajk Laszlo College of Advanced Studies (Budapest), and the Kiel Institute’s Bernhard Harms Prize. He has given a number distinguished lectures, including the American Economic Association’s annual Richard T. Ely Lecture, the L. K. Jha Memorial Lecture of the Reserve Bank of India, and the Frank Graham Memorial Lecture at Princeton. Dr. Obstfeld has served both on the Executive Committee and as Vice President of the American Economic Association. He has consulted and taught at the IMF and numerous central banks around the world.

He is also the co-author of two leading textbooks on international economics, International Economics (10th edition, 2014, with Paul Krugman and Marc Melitz) and Foundations of International Macroeconomics (1996, with Kenneth Rogoff), as well as more than 100 research articles on exchange rates, international financial crises, global capital markets, and monetary policy.

 

Latest posts:

5 Charts That Explain the Global Economy in 2018

2019-03-04T14:59:50-05:00December 20, 2018|

By Oya Celasun, Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, and Maurice Obstfeld

December 20, 2018

عربي中文, EspañolFrançais, 日本語, Português, Русский

The global economy started 2018 on a positive note but the momentum lost steam (photo: scyther5/iStock)

  1. The global economy started 2018 on an upbeat note, buoyed by a pickup in global manufacturing and trade through 2017. (more…)

Top 5 Blogs on Climate Change

2019-03-13T10:54:26-05:00December 12, 2018|

By IMFBlog

December 12, 2018

An arctic fox: climate change means Arctic ice has declined by 95 percent, according to recent science (photo: National Geographic/Newscom)

Mother Nature is trying to tell us something.  As the heat literally rises in so many ways, people have gathered in Poland for the United Nation’s latest Climate Summit, known as the COP24.  (more…)

A Planet at Risk Requires Multilateral Action

2019-03-13T11:01:39-05:00December 3, 2018|

Signe Krogstrup and Maurice Obstfeld

 December 3, 2018

عربي, 中文Español, Français,  日本語Português, Русский

A wolf in the snow: the planet isn’t crying wolf as man’s economic activities reach a scale where the global climate is at risk (photo: ImageBroker/ David MichaSheldon/Newscom)

The COP-21 Paris Agreement limiting greenhouse gas emissions was a major achievement on the road to meeting the threat of climate change. But as the evidence becomes increasingly unambiguous that human activity is destabilizing the Earth’s climate and biosphere, policymakers will need to do more. (more…)

Global Growth Plateaus as Economic Risks Materialize

2019-03-13T13:33:15-05:00October 8, 2018|

By Maurice Obstfeld

October 9, 2018

عربي中文, Español, FrançaisBaˈhasa indoneˈsia, 日本語, Русский

Uncertainty over trade policy is becoming a drag on economic activity (photo: Imagine China/Newscom)

The latest World Economic Outlook report projects that global growth will remain steady over 2018–19 at last year’s rate of 3.7 percent. This growth exceeds that achieved in any of the years between 2012 and 2016. It occurs as many economies have reached or are nearing full employment and as earlier deflationary fears have dissipated. Thus, policymakers still have an excellent opportunity to build resilience and implement growth-enhancing reforms.

(more…)

Steering the World Toward More Cooperation, Not Less

2019-03-13T14:49:12-05:00September 6, 2018|

By Vitor Gaspar, Sean Hagan, and Maurice Obstfeld

September 6, 2018

عربيBaˈhasa indoneˈsia中文,Español, Français日本語,Português,Русский

With the world becoming more interdependent than ever before, countries can achieve a lot when they pull together (photo: Anton Sokolov/iStock by Getty Images)

Countries cooperate if they perceive it to be in their best interests, both economically and politically.  (more…)

The Global Expansion: Still Strong but Less Even, More Fragile, Under Threat

2019-03-14T09:28:49-05:00July 16, 2018|

By Maurice Obstfeld

July 16, 2018

Versions in عربيBaˈhasa indoneˈsia中文EspañolFrançais日本語PortuguêsРусский 

The escalation of trade tensions is the greatest near-term threat to global growth (photo: wildpixel/Getty Images by iStock)

Amid rising tensions over international trade, the broad global expansion that began roughly two years ago has plateaued and become less balanced. (more…)

Global Economy: Good News for Now but Trade Tensions a Threat

2019-03-14T12:25:32-05:00April 17, 2018|

By Maurice Obstfeld

April 17, 2018

Versions in عربي (Arabic),  baˈhasa indoneˈsia (Indonesian), 中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Português (Portuguese), Русский (Russian)

Container ship in Colombo, Sri Lanka: the recent escalating tensions over trade present a growing risk to the global economy (photo: STRINGER/REUTERS/Newscom).

The world economy continues to show broad-based momentum. Against that positive backdrop, the prospect of a similarly broad-based conflict over trade presents a jarring picture.

Three months ago, we updated our global growth forecast for this year and next substantially, to 3.9 percent in both years. That forecast is being borne out by continuing strong performance in the euro area, Japan, China, and the United States, all of which grew above expectations last year. We also project near-term improvements for several other emerging market and developing economies, including some recovery in commodity exporters. Continuing to power the world economy’s upswing are accelerations in investment and, notably, in trade. (more…)

The Euro Area Needs a Fiscal Union

2019-03-15T10:26:56-05:00February 21, 2018|

By Helge Berger, Giovanni Dell’Ariccia, and Maurice Obstfeld

February 21, 2018

Version in Français (French) 

Without more tangible elements of a fiscal union, the euro area will remain fundamentally vulnerable to shocks. (photo: iStock by GettyImages) .

The euro area is experiencing a robust recovery, but the architecture supporting Europe’s currency union remains incomplete and leaves the region vulnerable to future financial crises.

While substantial progress has been made to address some architectural issues—conditional lending facilities and key elements of a banking union—we argue in our recent paper that the euro area needs to build elements of a common fiscal policy, including more fiscal risk sharing, to preserve financial and economic integration and stability. Without some degree of fiscal union, the region will continue to face existential risks that policymakers should not ignore. While this is not a new topic, the current favorable economic climate might be the moment to advance the discussion—and the chance to strengthen the euro area. (more…)

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