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Karen Ongley

2020-03-31T21:46:40-05:00March 24, 2020|

Karen Ongley is an Advisor in the IMF’s African Department and is currently Mission Chief for Sierra Leone. Since joining the IMF in 1998, Karen has worked on a range of low- and middle-income economies including Afghanistan, Albania, Egypt, Jordan, Nigeria, Yemen, and West Bank & Gaza. She has also worked extensively on IMF lending policies and other policy issues. Prior to joining the IMF, Karen worked on tax policy and international economy issues at the Australian Treasury, and as a policy advisor to a Cabinet Minister. She has degrees from the University of Sydney and Newcastle University.

 

Latest posts:

COVID-19 Pandemic and the Middle East and Central Asia: Region Facing Dual Shock

2020-05-13T11:31:00-05:00March 23, 2020|

This blog is part of a series providing regional analysis on the effects of the coronavirus.

By Jihad Azour

عربي, Español, Français, Português, Русский

The impact of COVID-19 and the oil price plunge in the Middle East and the Caucasus and Central Asia has been substantial and could intensify. With three-quarters of the countries reporting at least one confirmed case of COVID-19 and some facing a major outbreak, the coronavirus pandemic has become the largest near-term challenge to the region. (more…)

Tigran Poghosyan

2017-10-02T17:38:31-05:00October 2, 2017|

Tigran Poghosyan is Senior Economist at IMF’s Fiscal Affairs Department, where he covers fiscal issues in the euro area, and serves as an assistant to the Director. He also covered Ireland, Ukraine, Lithuania, Jordan, and Yemen in his previous assignments at the IMF, and was a principal contributor to various issues of the IMF Fiscal Monitor from 2012 to 2016. Prior to the IMF, he worked at the Central Bank of Armenia and was a visiting researcher at the Deutsche Bundesbank. His work on banking, international finance, asset pricing, and public finance has featured in IMF research and policy publications, books, and peer-reviewed journals, including Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, Journal of Banking and Finance, Economics of Transition, Empirical Economics. He holds two PhDs in Economics; from CERGE-EI and the University of Groningen.

No Time to Stand Still: Strengthening Global Growth and Building Inclusive Economies

2019-03-25T13:59:50-05:00July 5, 2017|

By Christine Lagarde

July 5, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese), Français (French), Deutsch (German), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

The port of Hamburg, Germany: G20 leaders meet to discuss policies to strengthen the global economic recovery (photo: Markus Lange/robertharding/Newscom)

Nearly sixty years ago, a little-known band called the Beatles arrived in Hamburg, got a haircut, recorded their first song, and found their sound.

Taking a cue from the Fab Four, world leaders gathering for the Group of Twenty Summit this week can make the most of their time in Hamburg—and leave Germany with a sound plan to strengthen global growth.

(more…)

Chart of the Week: Conflict’s Legacy for Growth

2019-03-25T16:17:19-05:00May 8, 2017|

By IMFBlog

Versions in عربي (Arabic)

May 8, 2017

Conflict has been on the rise since the early 2000s given the wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria.

 Conflict leads not only to immeasurable human costs, but also to substantial economic losses with consequences that can persist for years. The tragic rise in conflict has weighed on global GDP growth in recent years, given the increasing number of countries experiencing strife, the severe effect on economic activity, and the considerable size of some of the affected economies.

The IMF’s most recent World Economic Outlook (Box 1.1) takes a closer look through the lens of conflict’s impact on economic growth and migration.  (more…)

The Calculus of Conflict in the Middle East

2019-03-26T15:58:09-05:00September 16, 2016|

Lagarde.2015MDPORTRAIT4_114x128By Christine Lagarde

Versions in: عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese), Français (French), 日本語(Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

As world leaders head to New York this week for the United Nations General Assembly, there is still no end to the heart-breaking images of war-torn cities in the Middle East and North Africa, and of a massive exodus of people looking for sanctuary and opportunities to sustain a livelihood.

(more…)

Oil Prices and the Global Economy: It’s Complicated

2019-03-27T10:52:25-05:00March 24, 2016|

By Maurice Obstfeld, Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, and Rabah Arezki

Versions in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese), Français (French),
日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), Español (Spanish)

Oil prices have been persistently low for well over a year and a half now, but as the April 2016 World Economic Outlook will document, the widely anticipated “shot in the arm” for the global economy has yet to materialize. We argue that, paradoxically, global benefits from low prices will likely appear only after prices have recovered somewhat, and advanced economies have made more progress surmounting the current low interest rate environment.

(more…)

Sovereign Wealth Funds in the New Era of Oil

2019-03-27T14:37:31-05:00October 26, 2015|

By Rabah Arezki, Adnan Mazarei, and Ananthakrishnan Prasad 

(Versions in عربي and 中文)

As a result of the oil price plunge, the major oil-exporting countries are facing budget deficits for the first time in years. The growth in the assets of their sovereign wealth funds, which were rising at a rapid rate until recently, is now slowing; some have started drawing on their buffers.

In the short run, this phenomenon is not cause for alarm. Most oil exporters have enough buffers to withstand a temporary drop in oil prices. But what will happen if low oil prices persist, and how will policymakers react?

(more…)

Seeking Fairness in the Middle East and North Africa: How Taxation Can Help

2019-03-27T15:16:43-05:00September 8, 2015|

Pritha MitraBy Pritha Mitra

(Versions in Français and عربي)

Aspirations for greater fairness were at the core of the protests that triggered the Arab Spring almost five years ago—and remain largely unfulfilled today. In our new paper, we show that tax reform can go a long way towards meeting those aspirations.

Taxation is a critical interface between the state and citizens. How much revenue is raised, how the tax burden is distributed, and how taxation is implemented can all powerfully affect both the reality and the perception of economic opportunities—and the degree of trust in government.

(more…)

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