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Vivian Malta

2019-06-24T09:28:08-05:00June 19, 2019|

Vivian Malta is an economist in the Strategy, Policy and Review Department, where she has been working on analytical projects that tackle, at the same time, macroeconomic and inequality issues. Prior to joining the Fund, she worked as an economist at the World Bank’s office in Brazil, analyzing the economic outlook for that country, with more focus on fiscal policies. Vivian has also spent two years working in the financial industry as a macroeconomics researcher. She holds a Ph.D. in economics from FGV-EPGE and a bachelor’s degree in Industrial Engineering from PUC-Rio (both in Brazil). During her graduate studies she spent a year at Columbia University in the City of New York and at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York as a visiting scholar.

Latest Posts:

Chart of the Week: Sub-Saharan Africa’s Growth—A Tale of Different Experiences

2019-03-13T10:53:11-05:00December 13, 2018|

By IMFBlog

December 13, 2018

Villagers of Moruleng mining community in South Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa countries can see an increase in growth by relying less on commodities and more on non-resource intensive investments. (Photo: SIPHIWE SIBEKI/Reuters/Newscom)

The story of Africa’s growth rate over recent years is a tale with several story lines.  (more…)

Chart of the Week: Government Debt Is Not the Whole Story: Look at the Assets

2019-03-13T12:26:49-05:00October 23, 2018|

By IMFBlog

October 23, 2018

The Millennium Bridge in London, England: governments often don’t include the value of their assets, like bridges and roads, as well as natural resources, when they measure public wealth (Ingram Publishing/Newscom)

Lost track of your personal finances?  You are not alone.  Your government has often lost track of its finances too.  While it keeps close tabs on debt, it is less clear on how much it owns: the assets. (more…)

Global Growth Plateaus as Economic Risks Materialize

2019-03-13T13:33:15-05:00October 8, 2018|

By Maurice Obstfeld

October 9, 2018

عربي中文, Español, FrançaisBaˈhasa indoneˈsia, 日本語, Русский

Uncertainty over trade policy is becoming a drag on economic activity (photo: Imagine China/Newscom)

The latest World Economic Outlook report projects that global growth will remain steady over 2018–19 at last year’s rate of 3.7 percent. This growth exceeds that achieved in any of the years between 2012 and 2016. It occurs as many economies have reached or are nearing full employment and as earlier deflationary fears have dissipated. Thus, policymakers still have an excellent opportunity to build resilience and implement growth-enhancing reforms.

(more…)

Trade and Remittances Within Africa

2019-03-13T15:29:35-05:00August 1, 2018|

By Francisco Arizala, Matthieu Bellon, Margaux MacDonald, Montfort Mlachila, and Mustafa Y. Yenice

August 1, 2018 

Versions in FrançaisPortuguês

Countries in sub-Saharan Africa are more closely tied than ever, thanks to rising trade with one another and remittances (photo: AfricaImages/Getty Images by iStock)

Contrary to popular belief, countries in sub-Saharan Africa are more closely tied than ever, thanks to rising trade with one another and remittances—the money people send home when working in another country.  (more…)

Ending Harassment Helps #TheEconomyToo

2019-03-15T10:01:29-05:00March 5, 2018|

By Christine Lagarde, Corinne Deléchat, and Monique Newiak

March 5, 2018

Versions in عربي (Arabic),  中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Português (Portuguese)

Women who live in countries with stronger protection against harassment, including at work, are more likely to open a bank account, borrow and save, and use financial services such as mobile payments (iStock by Getty Images).

This International Women’s Day is bringing new calls to #pressforprogress on gender parity. Giving women and girls the opportunity to succeed is not only the right thing to do—it can also transform societies and economies.

Unlocking this transformative potential means pushing for more equal opportunities: for example, equality in legal rights for men and women, and equality in access to education, health, and finance. Just as important is the fundamental issue of ensuring a safe environment for all, including protection against harassment. (more…)

Chart of the Week: The Potential for Growth and Africa’s Informal Economy

2019-03-25T10:40:32-05:00August 8, 2017|

By IMFBlog

August 8, 2017

A street vendor sells roasted corn in Tanzania: Unregistered household enterprises comprise a significant portion of sub-Saharan Africa’s economy (photo: Ton Koene/VWPics/Newscom)

By 2035, sub-Saharan Africa will have added more working-age people to their workforce than the rest of the world’s regions combined. And this growing workforce will have to be met with jobs. In the region, up to 90 percent of jobs outside agriculture are in the informal sector. This includes household enterprises that are not formally registered, like street vendors or domestic workers. It also includes off-the-books activities by registered firms—for example, the taxi driver who offers a discount if the meter is not turned on.

(more…)

IMF Support for the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals

2019-03-25T12:40:32-05:00July 19, 2017|

By Stefania Fabrizio, Roland Kpodar, and Chris Lane

July 19, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic),  中文 (Chinese), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

Schoolchildren in line in Mali: Reducing the large gap between men’s and women’s education in some low-income states is one of the 2030 goals which IMF advice can address (photo: Stringer/Reuters/Newscom)

Since the adoption of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2015, we at the IMF have supported countries to reach their goals through policy advice, training, and financial support. Results will accrue over time, and we already see some notable progress. (more…)

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