Need a new search?

If you didn't find what you were looking for, try a new search!

Global Growth Plateaus as Economic Risks Materialize

By | October 8th, 2018|Advanced Economies, Africa, Annual Meetings, Asia, China, developing countries, Emerging Markets, Europe, inclusive growth, Interest Rates, labor markets, Latin America, Low-income countries, U.S.|

By Maurice Obstfeld

October 9, 2018

عربي中文, Español, FrançaisBaˈhasa indoneˈsia, 日本語, Русский

Uncertainty over trade policy is becoming a drag on economic activity (photo: Imagine China/Newscom)

The latest World Economic Outlook report projects that global growth will remain steady over 2018–19 at last year’s rate of 3.7 percent. This growth exceeds that achieved in any of the years between 2012 and 2016. It occurs as many economies have reached or are nearing full employment and as earlier deflationary fears have dissipated. Thus, policymakers still have an excellent opportunity to build resilience and implement growth-enhancing reforms.

Continue reading “Global Growth Plateaus as Economic Risks Materialize” »

Trade and Remittances Within Africa

By | August 1st, 2018|Africa, trade|

By Francisco Arizala, Matthieu Bellon, Margaux MacDonald, Montfort Mlachila, and Mustafa Y. Yenice

August 1, 2018 

Versions in FrançaisPortuguês

Countries in sub-Saharan Africa are more closely tied than ever, thanks to rising trade with one another and remittances (photo: AfricaImages/Getty Images by iStock)

Contrary to popular belief, countries in sub-Saharan Africa are more closely tied than ever, thanks to rising trade with one another and remittances—the money people send home when working in another country.  Continue reading “Trade and Remittances Within Africa” »

Ending Harassment Helps #TheEconomyToo

By | March 5th, 2018|developing countries, Economic outlook, education, Financial markets, Global Governance, inclusive growth, Inequality, International Monetary Fund, Investment, structural reforms|

By Christine Lagarde, Corinne Deléchat, and Monique Newiak

March 5, 2018

Versions in عربي (Arabic),  中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Português (Portuguese)

Women who live in countries with stronger protection against harassment, including at work, are more likely to open a bank account, borrow and save, and use financial services such as mobile payments (iStock by Getty Images).

This International Women’s Day is bringing new calls to #pressforprogress on gender parity. Giving women and girls the opportunity to succeed is not only the right thing to do—it can also transform societies and economies.

Unlocking this transformative potential means pushing for more equal opportunities: for example, equality in legal rights for men and women, and equality in access to education, health, and finance. Just as important is the fundamental issue of ensuring a safe environment for all, including protection against harassment. Continue reading “Ending Harassment Helps #TheEconomyToo” »

Chart of the Week: The Potential for Growth and Africa’s Informal Economy

By | August 8th, 2017|Africa, developing countries, Employment, Finance, growth, Inequality, labor markets, Uncategorized, wages|

By IMFBlog

August 8, 2017

A street vendor sells roasted corn in Tanzania: Unregistered household enterprises comprise a significant portion of sub-Saharan Africa’s economy (photo: Ton Koene/VWPics/Newscom)

By 2035, sub-Saharan Africa will have added more working-age people to their workforce than the rest of the world’s regions combined. And this growing workforce will have to be met with jobs. In the region, up to 90 percent of jobs outside agriculture are in the informal sector. This includes household enterprises that are not formally registered, like street vendors or domestic workers. It also includes off-the-books activities by registered firms—for example, the taxi driver who offers a discount if the meter is not turned on.

Continue reading “Chart of the Week: The Potential for Growth and Africa’s Informal Economy” »

IMF Support for the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals

By | July 19th, 2017|climate change, developing countries, Economic outlook, Economic research, education, Emerging Markets, Employment, Environment, Finance, Gender issues, Government, Inequality, International Monetary Fund, Jobs, labor force, Low-income countries, Middle East, Reform, South America, Uncategorized, unemployment, wages|

By Stefania Fabrizio, Roland Kpodar, and Chris Lane

July 19, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic),  中文 (Chinese), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

Schoolchildren in line in Mali: Reducing the large gap between men’s and women’s education in some low-income states is one of the 2030 goals which IMF advice can address (photo: Stringer/Reuters/Newscom)

Since the adoption of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2015, we at the IMF have supported countries to reach their goals through policy advice, training, and financial support. Results will accrue over time, and we already see some notable progress. Continue reading “IMF Support for the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals” »

Christopher Lane

By | July 18th, 2017|

Christopher Lane (clane@imf.org) is the Special Representative of the IMF to the United Nations. His IMF career has focused on macroeconomic policies and economic development in developing and emerging markets. Prior to taking up the UN position, Mr. Lane was responsible for operations and policy in about 70 low-income developing markets during 2012-16, including policy initiatives to provide debt relief to countries facing public health disasters (e.g., Ebola) and enhancing the financial safety net for developing countries. Mr. Lane has also engaged in policy and operational work on Liberia, Mali, Russia, Turkey, Lithuania, and Nigeria.

 

Latest post:

 

Transparency Pays: Emerging Markets Share More Data

By | July 7th, 2017|Africa, Asia, Debt Relief, Economic research, Emerging Markets, Government, International Monetary Fund, Investment, U.S.|

By Sangyup Choi and Stephanie Medina Cas

July 7, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese), 日本語, Français (French), (Japanese), Português (Portuguese), and Русский (Russian)

On the move in Mexico City, Mexico: emerging market economies that are transparent with their data can lower their borrowing costs (photo: Edgard Garrido/Reuters/Newscom)

If sunlight is the best disinfectant, as US Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis once famously said, can it also be a money maker? We have tried to quantify the financial gains from greater transparency that emerging market countries can achieve.

Continue reading “Transparency Pays: Emerging Markets Share More Data” »

No Time to Stand Still: Strengthening Global Growth and Building Inclusive Economies

By | July 5th, 2017|Advanced Economies, Aging, Asia, developing countries, Economic outlook, Economic research, Emerging Markets, G-20, Global Governance, inclusive growth, Inequality, International Monetary Fund, Jobs, technology, U.S.|

By Christine Lagarde

July 5, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese), Français (French), Deutsch (German), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

The port of Hamburg, Germany: G20 leaders meet to discuss policies to strengthen the global economic recovery (photo: Markus Lange/robertharding/Newscom)

Nearly sixty years ago, a little-known band called the Beatles arrived in Hamburg, got a haircut, recorded their first song, and found their sound.

Taking a cue from the Fab Four, world leaders gathering for the Group of Twenty Summit this week can make the most of their time in Hamburg—and leave Germany with a sound plan to strengthen global growth.

Continue reading “No Time to Stand Still: Strengthening Global Growth and Building Inclusive Economies” »

Banking On the Go

By | June 23rd, 2017|Africa, banking, developing countries, Finance, Financial regulation, growth, International Monetary Fund, Jobs, Low-income countries, Spring Meetings, technology|

By IMFBlog

June 23, 2017

Tayo Oviosu at IMF lecture (photo: Ryan Rayburn/IMF staff)

Worldwide, more than two billion people are without bank accounts, and only one in three adults in sub-Saharan Africa has access to any type of financial services. In this podcast, Tayo Oviosu, founder and CEO of Nigeria's leading mobile payment platform, Paga, reveals how his company is rapidly bringing millions of unbanked Nigerians into the banking fold. Continue reading “Banking On the Go” »

The Compact with Africa—The Contribution of the IMF

By | June 12th, 2017|Africa, developing countries, Economic outlook, Emerging Markets, Employment, Financial markets, G-20, Global Governance, Government, growth, inclusive growth, Inequality, Infrastructure, Interest Rates, International Monetary Fund, Investment, Jobs, labor force, labor markets, productivity|

By Christine Lagarde

June 12, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic),  中文 (Chinese), Deutsch (German), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde on a visit to Nigeria in 2016 (photo: IMF staff/Steve Jaffe)

Some of the world’s top policymakers and investors are gathering in Berlin to discuss a new initiative that could help reshape Africa’s economic future.

Millions of citizens could see tangible economic benefits from the recently launched Group of Twenty advanced and emerging economies' initiative, known as the “Compact with Africa.” The goal is to boost private investment by harnessing the expertise and resources of governments, investors, and international organizations.

The Compact is about facilitating projects that can lift productivity and living standards. It is about creating fresh opportunities on a continent where 70 percent of the population is under 35 years of age.

Continue reading “The Compact with Africa—The Contribution of the IMF” »

Load More Posts