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Karen Ongley

2020-03-31T21:46:40-05:00March 24, 2020|

Karen Ongley is an Advisor in the IMF’s African Department and is currently Mission Chief for Sierra Leone. Since joining the IMF in 1998, Karen has worked on a range of low- and middle-income economies including Afghanistan, Albania, Egypt, Jordan, Nigeria, Yemen, and West Bank & Gaza. She has also worked extensively on IMF lending policies and other policy issues. Prior to joining the IMF, Karen worked on tax policy and international economy issues at the Australian Treasury, and as a policy advisor to a Cabinet Minister. She has degrees from the University of Sydney and Newcastle University.

 

Latest posts:

Ensuring the Benefits of Capital Flows in the Middle East

2020-01-15T15:04:34-05:00January 15, 2020|

By Jihad Azour and Ling Zhu

عربي, Français

Since the global financial crisis of 2008, emerging market economies have experienced a surge in capital flows in response to significant monetary easing by major central banks. Gross capital inflows to the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) have remained high compared to other emerging markets, but their composition has changed significantly, with a surge in portfolio flows (equity and bond instruments) and a decline in foreign direct investment. (more…)

5 Things You Need to Know About the IMF and Climate Change

2019-03-14T10:35:05-05:00June 8, 2018|

By Ian Parry

June 8, 2018

Versions in  عربي,  中文,  Español, Français, 日本語Português, Русский 

A polar bear on shrinking ice in the Arctic: climate change means the world is getting hotter (photo: Sven-Erik Arndt/Newscom)

The world is getting hotter, resulting in rising sea levels, more extreme weather like hurricanes, droughts, and floods, as well as other risks to the global climate like the irreversible collapsing of ice sheets.  (more…)

Joannes Mongardini

2018-02-12T11:20:16-05:00February 6, 2018|

Joannes Mongardini is a deputy division chief in the IMF’s Research Department. At the IMF, his work to date has covered a wide range of countries—including Benin, Colombia, Egypt, Estonia, Jordan, Lebanon, the Republic of Congo, and Swaziland—and policy issues, like exchange rates, macroprudential policy, and regional integration. While on leave from the Fund, Mr. Mongardini worked for two years as chief economist for Qatar National Bank in Doha, Qatar. He holds a Ph.D. in economics.

 

Latest posts:

Economic Growth and Fairness in the Middle East and North Africa

2019-03-15T12:06:16-05:00January 18, 2018|

By Jihad Azour

January 18, 2018

Versions in  عربي (Arabic),  中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish),  Français (French),  Deutsche (German), 日本語 (Japanese)

The people of the region are rightly demanding economic growth and fairness.  The IMF aims to help them in this effort (photo: Tunis, Tunisia, ZOUBEIR SOUISSI/REUTERS/Newscom).

Rising social tensions and protests in several countries across the Middle East and North Africa are a clear indication that the aspirations of the people of the region—for opportunity, prosperity and equity—remain unfulfilled. Their frustration is understandable, and precisely because of that, it would be a mistake if the economic reform process currently underway were to be thrown into reverse. (more…)

5 Things You Need to Know About the IMF and Gender

2019-03-15T13:27:28-05:00November 22, 2017|

Woman engineer at work: The IMF’s research shows that countries can reap benefits from closing gender gaps (photo: nimis69/iStock by Getty Images)

By IMFBlog

November 22, 2017

Versions in  عربي (Arabic),  中文(Chinese); Español (Spanish);  Français (French); 日本語 (Japanese);  Русский (Russian)

Women count. They contribute to society in every way, including as a crucial part of their countries’ economic growth and prosperity.

Not long ago, few people would have expected the International Monetary Fund to be engaged in work on gender inequality. We began by incorporating gender analysis and policy advice in our annual assessments of countries’ economies. Today, with some 30 gender consultations completed, and a dozen more planned, we have made a dent. But there is still a long way to go. (more…)

Tigran Poghosyan

2017-10-02T17:38:31-05:00October 2, 2017|

Tigran Poghosyan is Senior Economist at IMF’s Fiscal Affairs Department, where he covers fiscal issues in the euro area, and serves as an assistant to the Director. He also covered Ireland, Ukraine, Lithuania, Jordan, and Yemen in his previous assignments at the IMF, and was a principal contributor to various issues of the IMF Fiscal Monitor from 2012 to 2016. Prior to the IMF, he worked at the Central Bank of Armenia and was a visiting researcher at the Deutsche Bundesbank. His work on banking, international finance, asset pricing, and public finance has featured in IMF research and policy publications, books, and peer-reviewed journals, including Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, Journal of Banking and Finance, Economics of Transition, Empirical Economics. He holds two PhDs in Economics; from CERGE-EI and the University of Groningen.

IMF Support for the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals

2019-03-25T12:40:32-05:00July 19, 2017|

By Stefania Fabrizio, Roland Kpodar, and Chris Lane

July 19, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic),  中文 (Chinese), Français (French), 日本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

Schoolchildren in line in Mali: Reducing the large gap between men’s and women’s education in some low-income states is one of the 2030 goals which IMF advice can address (photo: Stringer/Reuters/Newscom)

Since the adoption of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2015, we at the IMF have supported countries to reach their goals through policy advice, training, and financial support. Results will accrue over time, and we already see some notable progress. (more…)

Every Woman Counts: Gender Budgeting in G7 Countries

2019-03-25T16:07:34-05:00May 13, 2017|

By Christine Lagarde

May 13, 2017

Versions in عربي (Arabic), 中文 (Chinese),  Français (French),  本語 (Japanese), Русский (Russian), and Español (Spanish)

Finance ministers and central bank governors from the G7 countries met in Bari, Italy, this weekend to consider global economic issues, including steps to maintain economic stability and improving gender equality as important agenda items.

Women’s economic empowerment has long been an international priority, of course. The G6—as it was then—was first created in 1975, a year named “International Women’s Year” by the United Nations to help more women worldwide realize their full potential. Mountain climber Junko Tabei masterfully demonstrated this potential when she became the first woman to conquer Mount Everest in that year. However, as the world dealt with the aftermath of the first oil shock and the end of the fixed exchange rate system, global economic stability and women’s empowerment were rarely part of the same conversation.

Junko Tabei, the first woman to climb Mount Everest and the “Seven Summits”—the highest mountains across seven continents (photo: John van Hasselt/Corbis/Getty Images)

How times have changed. Today, in discussions on the global economy, female economic empowerment is almost always on the agenda. (more…)

A New Twist in the Link Between Inequality and Economic Development

2019-03-25T16:12:14-05:00May 11, 2017|

By Francesco Grigoli

May 11, 2017

Version in  عربي (Arabic),  Español (Spanish)

Much has been written about the relationship between inequality and economic development, but theory remains inconclusive. When income is more concentrated in the hands of a few individuals, this can lead to less demand by the general population and lower investment in education and health, impairing long-term growth. At the same time, a certain level of inequality endows the rich with the means to start businesses, and creates incentives to increase productivity and investment, promoting economic activity. But the initial inequality levels also matter to explain why an increase in inequality varies in its impact on economic development across countries.

(more…)

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