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Zaijin Zhan

2020-05-26T11:58:15-05:00May 22, 2020|

Zaijin Zhan is a Deputy Division Chief in the IMF’s Statistics Department, where he works on fiscal and public sector debt statistics. Since joining the IMF, he has worked extensively on IMF lending and surveillance policy issues, and a range of low-income and emerging market economies, including Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Ethiopia, Ghana, and South Africa. His research interests include fiscal transparency and sovereign debt issues.

Latest Posts:

Daniel Gurara

2020-02-18T10:07:32-05:00February 13, 2020|

Daniel Gurara is an Economist at the Strategy, Policy, and Review Department of the IMF. His research interest falls broadly under applied macro and microeconomics. He has published in leading international journals including in the American Economic Review and Journal of International and Finance. Previously, he was a Principal Research Economist at the African Development Bank and, prior to that, an Assistant Professor of Economics at Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia.

Latest posts:

Chart of the Week: Sub-Saharan Africa’s Growth—A Tale of Different Experiences

2019-03-13T10:53:11-05:00December 13, 2018|

By IMFBlog

December 13, 2018

Villagers of Moruleng mining community in South Africa; Sub-Saharan Africa countries can see an increase in growth by relying less on commodities and more on non-resource intensive investments. (Photo: SIPHIWE SIBEKI/Reuters/Newscom)

The story of Africa’s growth rate over recent years is a tale with several story lines.  (more…)

Realizing the Potential of the G20 Compact with Africa

2019-03-13T12:18:01-05:00October 30, 2018|

By Christine Lagarde

October 30, 2018

عربي, 中文Español, Français, 日本語Português, Русский

Power Plant, Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire. The G20 Compact with Africa was initiated under the German G20 Presidency to promote private investment in Africa, including in infrastructure. So far, eleven African countries have joined the initiative: Benin, Côte d’Ivoire, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Morocco, Rwanda, Senegal, Togo and Tunisia (photo: Thierry Gouegnon/Reuters/Newsom)

The Compact with Africa focuses on a fundamental challenge for the continent: how to accelerate private sector investment and create jobs. To realize its full potential, all parties need to deliver. (more…)

Chart of the Week: Distribution of Globalization’s Gains

2019-03-14T11:37:23-05:00May 31, 2018|

By IMFBlog

May 31, 2018

A garment factory in Ethiopia, which globalization has helped to boost its growth (photo: Kay Neitfeld/Newscom).

While globalization is generally good for economic growth, the benefits are subject to diminishing marginal returns, according to a recent study of 147 countries from 1970 to 2014. The study looks at how globalization affects the distribution of incomes across and within countries.   (more…)

Adapting to Climate Change—Three Success Stories

2019-03-14T13:42:52-05:00March 20, 2018|

By Evgenia Pugacheva and Mico Mrkaic

March 20, 2018

When governments subsidize private investment in adaptation, the economic costs of extreme weather events can be reduced (photo: Leolintang/iStock by Getty Images).

Climate change is one of the greatest threats facing our planet. Its negative effects on health, the biosphere, and labor productivity are already being felt throughout the world. Aware of the danger, communities, households, and governments have started taking measures to reduce their exposures and vulnerability to weather shocks and climate change. Our study in the World Economic Outlook shows that public investment in adaptation can partially reduce the economic costs of severe weather events.   (more…)

Chart of the Week: Inequality, Your Health, and Fiscal Policy

2019-03-15T11:06:05-05:00February 5, 2018|

By Mercedes García-EscribanoBaoping Shang, and Emmanouil (Manos) Kitsios

February 5, 2018 

 Catania Sicily, Italy.  Men with a lower level of education live shorter lives, on average, than their better educated fellow citizens (photo: Jann Huizenga/Getty Images/IStock).

The gap in life expectancy between rich and poor people is a worldwide phenomenon, and has grown dramatically in recent years in some countries. 

In our Chart of the Week, we show how this longevity gap, which reflects inequality in access to health care and its impact on peoples’ overall health, varies across countries. Men with a lower level of education live shorter lives, on average, than their better educated fellow citizens: this gap ranges from four years in Italy, to 14 years in Hungary, according to the October 2017 Fiscal Monitor. (more…)

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